Archive for the 60 Second Category

Results from the 60-Second Survey: The Future of the Book

Last month we asked what you thought of the future of the book in our latest 60-second survey, aptly titled, The Future of the Book. More than 1,300 people took our survey and this is what they said…

When asked, “Do you think paper books will eventually disappear,” almost 2 out of 3 respondents (63%) said paper books would never disappear. 15 percent said books would disappear within the next 50 years, 11 percent said within 51-100 years, and 11 percent said books would disappear in more than 100 years.
(Click on a chart for a larger, more detailed image.)

When asked, “What do you predict libraries will circulate in 10 years,” 43 percent of our respondents predict an equal amount of physical and electronic materials. On the other hand, only a slightly lower percentage of respondents – 39% – predict that libraries will circulate more electronic materials than physical.

Our survey also asked in what format (audio, electronic, or paper) respondents currently read fiction, non-fiction, and textbooks, as well as how they predict how they will read those materials 10 years from now. Those that use audio did not expect much change in 10 years (less than 1% change in each category). The largest expected transformation among respondents was for textbooks. 10 percent currently read them in an electronic format, but 59% expect to be reading them electronically in 10 years.

Survey respondents also predicted a change in how they will read fiction and non-fiction. Currently, 86 percent of our respondents read non-fiction in a paper format, but only 59 percent expect they will still be reading non-fiction that way in 10 years.

As for fiction, 88 percent of our respondents read fiction from paper books, but only 70% predict they will still read fiction that way in 10 years.

Additionally, almost 3 out of 4 of our respondents (71%) left comments about the future of the book. Stay tuned for more details about the results and the comments provided in an upcoming Fast Facts.

Let us know what you think about these results and the future of the book by leaving a comment below.

-Jamie

60-Second Survey: Future of the Book

Recently, news outlets and blogs have been busy deriding and celebrating the recent ascension of e-readers. The growing popularity of this new format has come with murmurs about the death of paper books and some even surmise that as technology advances libraries will cease to exist!

Taking notice of the chatter, Library Research Service has decided to survey librarians on the matter. This new 60-Second Survey asks your opinions on e-readers and how you think they will transform reading. Will e-readers be the demise of the paper book? What will libraries circulate? What is the future of the book? You tell us.
Click the link below to take the 60-Second Survey.

Survey closed–thanks for your interest.

“ASK” – A National Campaign for Reference?

In late 2008, LRS opened up a 60 Second Survey and asked librarians about the importance of reference, the future of reference, and the promotion of reference.

While the results have been on www.LRS.org for some time now, we have a new Fast Facts, “ASK” – A National Campaign for Reference?, that analyzes the findings and the comments left by respondents.

Take a look at what we found on the LRS Fast Facts page, or click on the title above for a pdf.

-Sean

Librarians Feel Effects of Economy

Has your job changed as a result of the recession? You’re not alone.

Our latest Fast Facts, Libraries and Librarians Feeling Effects of Economic Slowdown, discusses the results of a 60-Second Survey conducted earlier this year. Respondents’ personal observations indicate requests for help and use of library services have increased, along with the stress felt by librarians. To read more, visit our Fast Facts page or click on the link above.

Libraries and the Economic Recession Survey Results

In April, we launched the 60-second survey, “Libraries and the Economic Recession.” This survey was prompted by several news articles discussing the recession’s impact on libraries and librarians.

We wanted to know what folks on the front lines had observed about the economy, and how the recession had impacted their work and their career plans. Nearly 500 people responded.

The results indicate that libraries are indeed seeing increases in use and requests for assistance, and librarians are feeling the squeeze themselves.

When asked, “In the last 12 months, have you had to help more library patrons with the following services,” 70 percent selected “computer use,” which included help with software and Internet searching. More than three in five (66%) said they’ve had more requests for assistance with job-seeking activities, such as online job applications and resume preparation.

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Similarly, when asked, “In the last 12 months, have you personally noticed an increase in use of the following resources in your library,” 67 percent reported increases in public access computer use by patrons, while more than half said they’ve noticed an increase in library visits (63%) and circulation of materials (54%).

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When asked, “To better serve patrons, do you feel a need for additional professional training in any of the following areas,” nearly half of the respondents (46%) indicated they could use training on available public assistance/social programs.

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When asked, “As a result of the current economic downturn, do you feel a need for additional training in any of the following areas for your own professional development,” more than two in five (44%) said they would benefit from stress management training. One in three (31%) indicated they could use additional training on how to deal with difficult patrons.

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In addition, more than half the respondents shared personal observations about how the recession is impacting their libraries and their patrons.

More detail about the results of this 60-second survey will be published in an upcoming edition of Fast Facts. Let us know what you think about the recession’s impact on libraries by leaving a comment below.

Briana

Reference Service – Where is it Going? Survey Results

In December 2008, we launched the 60-second survey, “Reference Service – Where is it Going?” The survey was prompted by a discussion on a listserv for librarians working on virtual reference desks around the country. (Thanks Kris Johnson for the tip!)

Clearly a hot topic, we received 1,500 responses from library staff and others reading library blogs, listservs, etc.

Not surprisingly, respondents indicated that reference services are important to both the public and the library itself.

(Click on a chart for a larger, more detailed image.)

When asked “how great is the need for librarian-assisted search services in today’s information environment,” nearly everyone (99%) said it was needed or greatly needed.


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Similarly, respondents thought reference was vital to the library as an institution. 98% of respondents indicated important or very important when asked “how critical are reference services to the survival of libraries?”



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Respondents widely believed that virtual reference will play a big part in the future of library services. Asked “do you think virtual reference services are the future of library reference” nearly 9 out of 10 respondents said “yes.” However, most did not believe it would replace in-person reference.


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In spite of its importance, respondents felt reference was not promoted adequately. 9 out of 10 indicated “the library profession should do more to promote reference services.”


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Recently there has been discussion among librarians about establishing a national effort to promote reference services at libraries. For example, an “ASK” campaign that would be similar to ALA’s “Read” campaign. The majority of respondents (83%) thought “a professional organization should launch a national campaign promoting reference services at libraries.”


Details

More detail about the results of this 60-second survey will be published in an upcoming edition of Fast Facts. Let us know what you think about reference services in libraries by leaving a comment below.

-Zeth & Nicolle

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