Archive for the Public Category

Who Knew? Back to School Fun Facts

In 2006, Colorado had 1,420 school libraries staffed by 1,652 FTE staff–817 of them endorsed school librarians. Collections included nearly 14 million print books and a total circulation of 36 million. School libraries had 14.8 million individual visits and 1.5 million group visits, underscoring the library as a place for students to study, conduct research, meet with each other, and, most importantly, learn information literacy.[1]

Sixty-two percent of college students said they would choose an electronic textbook over a new print textbook, according to a new study by Versaware.[2]

15 states (alas, not Colorado) had ‘Sales Tax Holidays’ during the month of August – periods of time with no sales tax on certain school-related items.[3]

“We expect more than 53 million students to be enrolled in the nation’s elementary and high schools this fall, and that’s even higher than the total enrollment in 1969 when the last of the baby boomers were still in school,” says Robert Bernstein of the U.S. Census Bureau.[4]

The US produced 10 billion pounds of apples in 2006. The chances are good that the apples your children present to their teachers or enjoy for lunch were grown in Washington state, which accounted for more than half of the nation’s total production.[5]

Average annual 2005 earnings of workers 18 and older with an advanced degree was $79,946. This compares with $54,689 a year for those with bachelor’s degrees, $29,448 for those with a high school diploma only and $19,915 for those without a high school diploma.[6]

13.6 million computers are available for classroom use in the nation’s 111,000 elementary and secondary schools; that comes down to 1 computer for every 4 students.[7]

The average cost before financial aid for one year of a full-time master’s degree education at a public institution in 2003-04 was $21,900 (includes tuition and fees, books and supplies, and other living expenses).[8]

The average cumulative amount borrowed for a master’s degree for those graduating in 2003-04 was $27,200.[9]

Back-to-school spending is estimated reach $17.6 billion, up from a poor showing of $13.4 billion last year, according to the National Retail Federation’s (NRF) 2006 Back-to-School Consumer Intentions and Actions Survey. Average back-to-school spending by category and family for primary and secondary school age children: [10]

* Electronics/Computers: $114.38
* Apparel/Accessories: $228.14
* Shoes: $98.34
* School Supplies: $86.22

For more Back to School Fun Facts visit:

Facts for Features at the U.S. Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/010218.html

IES’s Back to School Statistics at the NCES: http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=372

________________________________

[1]LRS.org Big Facts: http://www.lrs.org/quotable.php
[2]InternetNews.com: http://www.internetnews.com/bus-news/article.php/5541_550821
[3]Stateline.org: http://www.stateline.org/live/details/story?contentId=232007
[4]U.S. Census Bureau, RadioZone: Quotes & Sound Bites: http://www.census.gov/pubinfo/www/radio/sb_03back2school.html
[5]USDA: http://www.nass.usda.gov/index.asp
[6]U.S. Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/education/009749.html
[7]U.S. Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2003/cb03ff-11.html
[8]Institute of Education Sciences: http://nces.ed.gov/das/library/tables_listings/show_nedrc.asp?rt=p&tableID=2146
[9]Student Financing of Graduate and First-Professional Education, 2003–04: Profiles of Students in Selected Degree Programs and Part-Time Students (See Table 2.13.) at: http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006185
[10]About.com: Retail Industry: http://retailindustry.about.com/od/sales_holiday/a/back_to_school.htm

2007 ALA Salary Survey Results Now Available

ALA announced this week that the 2007 edition of the “ALA-APA Salary Survey: Librarian – Public and Academic” and “ALA-APA Salary Survey: Non-MLS – Public and Academic” are now available. Published by the American Library Association-Allied Professional Association (ALA-APA), the survey reports the median salary for librarians is up 2.8 percent to $57,809 in 2007.

ALA Press Release & ordering information: http://www.ala.org/ala/pressreleases2007/august2007/alaapa07.htm

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

Where are all the library jobs?

Do you want to know where library jobs are? Now you can see them on the map.

As the next step in its evolution, LibraryJobline.org now offers maps showing the location of current library job openings in Colorado and elsewhere. There are three ways to access the maps:

• Check out the locations of all current job openings at http://www.LibraryJobline.org/map.php,
• Search LibraryJobline.org at http://www.LibraryJobline.org/search.php and view a map of positions that meet your search parameters, or
• Login to MyJobline ( http://www.LibraryJobline.org/mylogin.php) and view a map of positions that fit your personal criteria

Happy searching!

Social Networking Study Released by NSBA

The study, ” Creating & Connecting: Research and Guidelines on Online Social – and Educational – Networking” looks at the usage of social networking by 9 to 17-year olds. Three groups were surveyed for the study: tweens and teens (9 to 17-year olds), parents, and school district leaders.

From the report…
* 59% of online students say they talk about education related topics
* 50% of online students say they talk specifically about schoolwork
* Less than 1% of all students say they’ve actually met someone in person from an online encounter without their parents’ permission
* 84% of school districts have rules against online chatting and 81% against instant messaging in school

Sections of the report include The Positives, The Gaps, Expectations & Interests, and Striking a Balance-Guidance & Recommendations for School Board Members. The study was conducted by Grunwald Associates and underwritten by News Corporation, Microsoft and Verizon.

The report: http://www.nsba.org/site/docs/41400/41340.pdf
NSBA: http://www.nsba.org/site/index.asp

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

Historical Circ Data Creates Some Buzz

Colorado public libraries’ historical circulation data is included in a recent study that is making the rounds on blogs, listservs, and email lists. Written by economist Douglas A. Galbi, “ Book Circulation Per U.S. Public Library User Since 1856,” is an analysis of library circulation trends from various sources going back over 150 years. Included in the analysis is Colorado library circulation data from 1920 through 2000, which appears in an LRS Fast Fact from 2003, “ Colorado Public Libraries Historical Data” written by Becky Russell.

Complete online circulation report from Galbi: http://www.galbithink.org/libraries/circulation.htm
More library data analysis from Galbi: http://www.galbithink.org/libraries/analysis.htm
Homepage for Douglas Galbi: http://galbithink.org/
LRS Fast Facts, “Colorado Public Libraries Historical Data”: http://www.lrs.org/documents/fastfacts/198_historical_pl_data.pdf

Thanks to Denise Davis at the ALA Office for Research & Statistics and Larry T. Nix, Library History Buff, for emailing this link to me.

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

2006 Metro Report Now Available

The 2006 Metro Report is now available. The Metro Report consists of tables and charts of statistics from selected public libraries in metropolitan areas with operating expenditures greater than $1 million.

Daphne
Eastburn_D@cde.state.co.us

Stats Show Libraries Increasingly Popular

Public library directors report increased circulation, program attendance, and computer use, says a recent article in the Boston Globe. “Area directors say they have also seen growth in ways not measured by circulation, like use of public computers and attendance at library programs. “We’re busier than ever,” said Beth Mazin, assistant director of Andover’s Memorial Hall Library. “Our library is jammed with people.”

For more on this story go the Boston Globe online at:

http://www.boston.com/news/globe/?p1=Header_BostonGlobe

Or the article at:
Good circulation…Internet helps libraries, despite predictions it would spell the end

http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2007/07/29/good_circulation/

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

2006 Public Library Statistics — Available

The 2006 Public Library Statistics are now finalized and available on our site. Go to our Public Stats Page to find spreadsheets, PDFs, and interactive statistics for 2006.

Zeth
-lietzau_z@cde.state.co.us

Predictions for Library Jobs in 2030

A recent article in Education Week shares various views on the growth of jobs in libraries and education. One expert is quoted, “from 2004 to 2014, the employment sector composed of library, training, and teaching jobs is anticipated to add nearly 2 million jobs—a jump of 20 percent.” Another expert predicts these jobs will decline 74% by 2030. The article is aptly titled, “Job Skills of the Future in Researchers’ Crystal Ball.” Read more at http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2007/06/20/42skills.h26.html.

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

LRS @ ALA 2007

LRS staff recently returned from the ALA Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. We enjoyed soaking in the conference, and wanted to share some of our experiences with you.

Jennifer’s Top 5 Tips for First-Time ALA Conference Attendees

5. Stay in a hotel with colleagues. After a day of socializing with strangers it’s nice to share thoughts and ideas about the conference with a buddy.

4. Dress in layers. Walking from each location can cause you to heat up fast, but most of the conference spaces are very cool.

3. Choose several sessions for each time slot. Having alternatives allows you to change plans at the last minute due issues such as location or overcrowding.

2. Don’t be afraid to exit or enter sessions during presentations. Due to the scope and variety of the conference, it is impossible to see every thing in its entirety. Also, presentations may turn out to be not what you expected.

1. Wear comfortable shoes! Although it is a professional conference, comfy shoes are acceptable. Plan for lots of walking and standing on concrete.

Nicolle shares:

Over and over again I heard how one thing or another compared to Library Thing. Library Thing: http://www.librarything.com/

Take a look at the tag cloud at University of Pennsylvania’s PENNTAGS. “PennTags is a social bookmarking tool for locating, organizing, and sharing your favorite online resources.” PennTags: http://tags.library.upenn.edu/

Keith shared with AASL (http://www.ala.org/ala/aasl/aaslindex.cfm) members and other conference attendees preliminary findings from the first annual school library survey, School Libraries Count (http://www.aaslsurvey.org/). Look for more at the AASL conference in Reno this fall.

Also, look for an update from the ALA Committee on Research & Statistics: http://www.ala.org/ala/ors/orscommittees/corsagendasminutes/corsagendasandminutes.htm

I (Zeth) spent most of my conference time immersed in sessions revolving around the topic du jour in the world of libraries – Library 2.0. I heard a lot about blogs, wikis, podcasts, social networking and, or course, Second Life. The thing that struck me most, though, was the fact that there is a lot going on by way of open source software in libraries. Examples:

Evergreen (http://www.open-ils.org/), and open source ILS first implemented by the Georgia Library PINES consortium, has some pretty great functionality.

Ann Arbor District Library (http://www.aadl.org/) has transformed their website using Drupal (http://drupal.org/), an open-source content management system.

The University of Rochester is working on an extensible catalog (http://extensiblecatalog.info/), to interact with existing catalogs to provide better services.

All of these could be great opportunities to customize your ILS/website, especially if you have staff that can program.

If you went to ALA and would like to share your experience, let us know in the comments. And, for more conference highlights be sure check out ALA Conference Highlights: http://link.ixs1.net/s/ve?eli=3130100&si=y98459802&cfc=3html.

Daphne’s Highlights:

I attended several sessions covering a wide variety of topics from Global Librarianship to Social Networking ~ Harnessing the Hive and a session with researchers presenting their library research.

I was so happy to see one of my favorite mystery writers, Patricia Cornwell. During her session, she spent a lot of time answering questions from the audience and also had a few questions of her own for librarians. She concluded with an inspirational message for us all, “Touch one person, do one good thing, and collectively we will change the planet”.

Beth Strickland’s Two Cents:

If the rest of you are anything like me, you will find that after attending your first ALA conference you’ll have an unexplained craving to plan on attending every ALA annual conference until you retire (and even then, that probably won’t keep you away).

Although the majority of sessions I attended were about academic libraries and diversity issues, I was able to attend a session about designing video games for college students which teach information literacy skills. If this is a topic you are interested in, I suggest finding related articles on the ASIS&T (The Information Society for the Information Age) website located at: http://www.asis.org/ or, go to the blog address listed below which provides a forum for librarians interested in using video games to teach, a space to discuss a variety of topics: http://bibliogaming.blogspot.com/

Lastly, if you are interested in LIS research and want to get a glimpse of new research coming down the pipeline I suggest attending the session about the research being done by LIS graduate students from around the country. Some amazing work is coming from some PhD students at the University of Maryland: http://www.clis.umd.edu/research/students/ Check it out if you want idea of where the future of LIS research is going.

Oh, and quick little P.S. here…but if you are approached by vendors trying to sell you something you’re not interested in, just tell them you are an LIS student. This is a sure fire way to make sure they leave you alone.

See you next year!

Carla’s observations:

I was impressed and overwhelmed by the variety of topics covered at ALA. I had a hard time choosing between some of the fun-sounding new technologies sessions and those discussing the more traditional topics. It was interesting to select from session topics that dealt with rural libraries, or how library resources are used to help in the preparation of theatrical productions of Shakespeare’s plays, and even one on The European Union Today which discussed the changing European identity and its implications on libraries and scholarship. It was a fabulous experience and I came away from it with lots of new information for me to think about and new ways for me to get involved.

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