Archive for the Public Category

Predictions for Library Jobs in 2030

A recent article in Education Week shares various views on the growth of jobs in libraries and education. One expert is quoted, “from 2004 to 2014, the employment sector composed of library, training, and teaching jobs is anticipated to add nearly 2 million jobs—a jump of 20 percent.” Another expert predicts these jobs will decline 74% by 2030. The article is aptly titled, “Job Skills of the Future in Researchers’ Crystal Ball.” Read more at http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2007/06/20/42skills.h26.html.

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

LRS @ ALA 2007

LRS staff recently returned from the ALA Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. We enjoyed soaking in the conference, and wanted to share some of our experiences with you.

Jennifer’s Top 5 Tips for First-Time ALA Conference Attendees

5. Stay in a hotel with colleagues. After a day of socializing with strangers it’s nice to share thoughts and ideas about the conference with a buddy.

4. Dress in layers. Walking from each location can cause you to heat up fast, but most of the conference spaces are very cool.

3. Choose several sessions for each time slot. Having alternatives allows you to change plans at the last minute due issues such as location or overcrowding.

2. Don’t be afraid to exit or enter sessions during presentations. Due to the scope and variety of the conference, it is impossible to see every thing in its entirety. Also, presentations may turn out to be not what you expected.

1. Wear comfortable shoes! Although it is a professional conference, comfy shoes are acceptable. Plan for lots of walking and standing on concrete.

Nicolle shares:

Over and over again I heard how one thing or another compared to Library Thing. Library Thing: http://www.librarything.com/

Take a look at the tag cloud at University of Pennsylvania’s PENNTAGS. “PennTags is a social bookmarking tool for locating, organizing, and sharing your favorite online resources.” PennTags: http://tags.library.upenn.edu/

Keith shared with AASL (http://www.ala.org/ala/aasl/aaslindex.cfm) members and other conference attendees preliminary findings from the first annual school library survey, School Libraries Count (http://www.aaslsurvey.org/). Look for more at the AASL conference in Reno this fall.

Also, look for an update from the ALA Committee on Research & Statistics: http://www.ala.org/ala/ors/orscommittees/corsagendasminutes/corsagendasandminutes.htm

I (Zeth) spent most of my conference time immersed in sessions revolving around the topic du jour in the world of libraries – Library 2.0. I heard a lot about blogs, wikis, podcasts, social networking and, or course, Second Life. The thing that struck me most, though, was the fact that there is a lot going on by way of open source software in libraries. Examples:

Evergreen (http://www.open-ils.org/), and open source ILS first implemented by the Georgia Library PINES consortium, has some pretty great functionality.

Ann Arbor District Library (http://www.aadl.org/) has transformed their website using Drupal (http://drupal.org/), an open-source content management system.

The University of Rochester is working on an extensible catalog (http://extensiblecatalog.info/), to interact with existing catalogs to provide better services.

All of these could be great opportunities to customize your ILS/website, especially if you have staff that can program.

If you went to ALA and would like to share your experience, let us know in the comments. And, for more conference highlights be sure check out ALA Conference Highlights: http://link.ixs1.net/s/ve?eli=3130100&si=y98459802&cfc=3html.

Daphne’s Highlights:

I attended several sessions covering a wide variety of topics from Global Librarianship to Social Networking ~ Harnessing the Hive and a session with researchers presenting their library research.

I was so happy to see one of my favorite mystery writers, Patricia Cornwell. During her session, she spent a lot of time answering questions from the audience and also had a few questions of her own for librarians. She concluded with an inspirational message for us all, “Touch one person, do one good thing, and collectively we will change the planet”.

Beth Strickland’s Two Cents:

If the rest of you are anything like me, you will find that after attending your first ALA conference you’ll have an unexplained craving to plan on attending every ALA annual conference until you retire (and even then, that probably won’t keep you away).

Although the majority of sessions I attended were about academic libraries and diversity issues, I was able to attend a session about designing video games for college students which teach information literacy skills. If this is a topic you are interested in, I suggest finding related articles on the ASIS&T (The Information Society for the Information Age) website located at: http://www.asis.org/ or, go to the blog address listed below which provides a forum for librarians interested in using video games to teach, a space to discuss a variety of topics: http://bibliogaming.blogspot.com/

Lastly, if you are interested in LIS research and want to get a glimpse of new research coming down the pipeline I suggest attending the session about the research being done by LIS graduate students from around the country. Some amazing work is coming from some PhD students at the University of Maryland: http://www.clis.umd.edu/research/students/ Check it out if you want idea of where the future of LIS research is going.

Oh, and quick little P.S. here…but if you are approached by vendors trying to sell you something you’re not interested in, just tell them you are an LIS student. This is a sure fire way to make sure they leave you alone.

See you next year!

Carla’s observations:

I was impressed and overwhelmed by the variety of topics covered at ALA. I had a hard time choosing between some of the fun-sounding new technologies sessions and those discussing the more traditional topics. It was interesting to select from session topics that dealt with rural libraries, or how library resources are used to help in the preparation of theatrical productions of Shakespeare’s plays, and even one on The European Union Today which discussed the changing European identity and its implications on libraries and scholarship. It was a fabulous experience and I came away from it with lots of new information for me to think about and new ways for me to get involved.

Fast Facts Notifications Available via RSS

Have you set up your RSS reader yet? If so, here’s another resource to add – you can now subscribe to our Fast Facts Notification RSS feed at http://www.lrs.org/fastfacts/rss.xml

If you haven’t subscribed to any RSS feeds yet, here’s your chance. Sign up with an RSS reader (google, blogglines, etc.) and paste the above URL as a new subscription.

Zeth
-lietzau_z@cde.state.co.us

Library Workers: Facts & Figures, 2007

This collection of national statistics about library workers is gathered by the AFL-CIO’s Department for Professional Employees from a variety of sources, including the Bureau of Labor Statistics, ARL, ALA, and the Census Bureau.

From ALA’s American Libraries Direct (6/6/07): “This handy, annotated compilation includes employment statistics and projections, notes on diversity and pay inequity, the wage gap, institutional variance, benefits, and unionization in the library profession.”

This document is packed with interesting tidbits. For example, here are three fun facts to know and tell…

* In 2006, there were 229,000 librarians, 119,000 library assistants, and 113,940 library technicians.

* In addition to [all] library workers being poorly paid because they are predominantly female, those library workers who are women may well be paid less than those who are men.

* Most librarians work in school and academic libraries. About one-fourth work in public libraries.

Check it out at: http://www.dpeaflcio.org/programs/factsheets/fs_2007_library_workers.htm.

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

Public Library Annual Report Closed

So, where’s the final data you ask? It will be at least another month until the final data from the 2006 Public Library Annual Report is available. (Note, the preliminary data file is posted on the LRS.org homepage.) I apologize for the delay, but we had half a dozen libraries that were late submitting their reports. Unfortunately, we all pay the price when a library is late submitting its report because the data file is not considered final until it goes through the next two levels of federal edit checks which can only happen after all the statewide public library data is received.

Watch this space for an announcement of the final data…or feel free to email me with questions or concerns.

Thanks for your patience.
Nicolle

Preliminary Results of 2006 Public Library Survey are Available

Preliminary results of the 2006 Public Library Survey are available and posted at

http://www.lrs.org/documents/plstat06/preliminary_master_data.xls

~Daphne
Eastburn_D@cde.state.co.us

LRS.org has gone .php

LRS.org has undergone a major behind-the-scenes overhaul, switching hosts, and changing our programming language from .asp to .php. The big advantage that you’ll see from this change is that the features on the LRS-i section of the site should retrieve data much more rapidly. The downside is that you’ll need to change your bookmarks and links from .asp to .php. We have suffered some growing pains as we’ve done this, and are still catching some bad links that did not make the crossover. If you notice any dead links, or strange site (mal)functions, please let me know.

Also, for those of you receiving our feed through an RSS reader, you’ll need to repoint your readers to http://www.lrs.org/blog/rss.xml to get our feed.

Thanks for your patience.
Zeth
lietzau_z@cde.state.co.us

Graphic Novels and Instant Messaging Field Initated Studies

Public librarians may be interested in two recently posted Field Initatied Studies (FIS).
The Graphic Novels FIS is a summary of responses from public libraries to the inquiry regarding where to shelve graphic novels.
The Instant Messaging FIS is a summary of responses received from public libraries regarding an inquiry about policies on instant messaging using the libraries computers.
You may click on the titles above or see our Field Initated Section for more information.

~ Daphne
Eastburn_D@cde.state.co.us

Statewide Courier is a Savings

We’ve just published a new Fast Facts – Statewide Courier Saves Libraries Thousands in Shipping Costs Each Year. This FF is the result of a study to determine the cost-effectiveness of the statewide Courier. And yes, the courier is very cost-effective.

Zeth
lietzau_z@cde.state.co.us

Is $40,000 the Magic Number

The latest Fast Facts titled, Is $40,000 the Magic Number? may be of interest to public librarians in Colorado.

It focuses on the recent American Library Association~Allied Professional Association declaration that beginning professional librarians should be paid a starting salary of no less than $40,000.

If you would like to find out where Colorado stands in regards to this issue, check out this Fast Facts issue at:

http://www.lrs.org/documents/fastfacts/250_40000.pdf

~Daphne
Eastburn_D@cde.state.co.us

Page 19 of 26« First...10...1718192021...Last »

POPULAR RESOURCES

  • Public Library Statistics & Profiles
    Dive into annual statistics from the Colorado Public Library Annual Report using our interactive tool, results tailored to trustees, and state totals and averages.
  • School Library Impact Studies
    School libraries have a profound impact on student achievement. Explore studies about this topic by LRS and other researchers in our comprehensive guide.
  • Fast Fact Reports
    Looking for a quick rundown of library research? Check out our Fast Facts, which highlight research and statistics about various library topics.

LIBRARYJOBLINE

See more @ LibraryJobline.org

ABOUT

LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Staff & Contact Info