Archive for the Public Category

Coloradans Embrace AskColorado and AskAcademic

LRS recently completed an evaluation of the statewide 24/7 virtual reference service AskColorado, as well as its academic queue AskAcademic. Between April and October 2011, nearly 1,300 users completed customer exit surveys. The results indicate that users are pleased with these services and are likely to be repeat users. Four out of five users (80%) rated AskColorado librarians as “very helpful” or “helpful,” and six out of seven users (85%) said that they would be “very likely” or “likely” to use the service again. Satisfaction was even higher among AskAcademic users. Nearly 9 in 10 AskAcademic survey respondents (89%) indicated that the librarians who assisted them were either very helpful or helpful , and most (94%) said that they were “very likely” or “likely” to utilize the service again.  Compared with previous AskColorado evaluations, in 2011 the service received its highest ratings yet on these measures.

See the Fast Facts and Closer Look report for more details.

~Linda

New Fast Facts: “A Brief Look at Librarian Salaries in U.S. and Colorado Public Libraries”

Comparisons between the 2010 ALA-APA Annual Salary Survey and the 2010 Public Library Annual Report (PLAR) compiled by the Library Research Service show that across professional library positions in Colorado, salaries are pretty evenly matched with national averages, with the exception of library directors. Within Colorado and nationally, library professionals in large and very large public libraries out-earn their peers in medium-sized libraries.   Read the latest Fast Facts to find out where your salary falls on the Colorado and national public library pay scales: “A Brief Look at Librarian Salaries in U.S. and Colorado Public Libraries.”

~Chelsea

Public Libraries in the Digital Age

Pew researchers gave a presentation at COSLA‘s spring meeting this week, “Public Libraries in the Digital Age.” The presentation slides as well as fact sheets on e-reading and Pew’s timeline for their 3-year study of libraries can be found at this link: http://pewinternet.org/Presentations/2012/Apr/Public-libraries-in-the-digital-age.aspx.

~Linda

Pew Research Posts a Sneak Peek of Their Research Timeline for Their 2-Year Study of Libraries

Pew Research has posted a timeline of the various research activities they will engage in for their 2-year study of libraries (funded by the Gates Foundation). Their first major report from this study, on e-reading, has received widespread coverage over the past week. Upcoming activities include:

  • a survey of librarians regarding e-books,
  • studies on library use by community type and habits of younger library users,
  • a study on the role of libraries in special populations, and
  • a study of library users’ needs and experiences, from which library user typologies will be developed.

Pew Research is also looking for volunteer study participants. If you’re a librarian working in a public library that has e-books available for checkout, or if you ever check out or download e-books from a public library, you can sign up here.

~Linda

 

New Fast Facts: Public Library Challenges, 2010

Every year, LRS collects information from Colorado public libraries on challenges to their materials and services. 66 challenges were reported in 2010, with challenges to Internet sites and videos both surpassing books for the first time. Read our latest Fast Facts for more: Challenged Materials in Colorado Public Libraries, 2010.

~Julie

Preliminary 2011 Public Library Data Now Available

Preliminary data from the 2011 Colorado Public Library Annual Report is now available: http://www.lrs.org/documents/plstat11/preliminary_2011_public_library_data_20120403.xls

Preliminary Status
A few libraries are still working on getting their data in, however, the vast majority have submitted their reports. The data is considered preliminary until we receive data from all public libraries and all edit checks have been resolved.

About Edit checks
The first round of edit checks are done before respondents complete and submit the survey. The second, third, and even fourth, round of edit checks are done by state library staff (read: me) in cooperation with the U.S. Census Bureau, the federal agency that collects and verifies the public library data for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

 Questions? Need more information?  Contact me at steffen_n at cde.state.co.us.

 Thanks to all the public library directors (and their staff) for submitting data for the PLAR.
~Nicolle

High Traffic, Low Cost: The Colorado Courier Continues to Save Libraries Millions Annually in Shipping Charges

In Fall 2011, we conducted a study of the statewide courier system to determine the quantity and type of materials that libraries were sending via the courier system, and then to estimate, based on these numbers, the system’s cost effectiveness versus using a commercial service. Our results showed that the courier system continues to provide substantial cost savings to participating libraries. Colorado libraries send an estimated 5.9 million items annually via the courier system. Compared with the costs of using a commercial shipping service (USPS, UPS, or FedEx), they save up to an estimated $7.1 million per year by using the courier.

Find out more in the Fast Facts report.

~Linda

Library Visits at Historic High — Visits Top 1.5 Billion

In a press release issued today, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) confirmed what most public library staff already knew—library visits are up, way up. In the last decade public libraries were visited 1.59 billion times, a 24.4% increase in visits per capita and total visits increase of almost 40%.

From IMLS:  “The Institute’s analysis of the data showed that per capita visits and circulation rose in the century’s first decade. The number of public libraries increased during that period but not enough to keep pace with the rise in population. Library staffing remained stable, though the percentage of public libraries with degreed and accredited librarians increased.

The report also found that the nature and composition of collections in U.S. public libraries is changing, indicating that library collections are becoming more varied. Although the volume of print materials decreased over the 10 years studied, collections overall continued to grow because of increases in the number of audio, video, and electronic book materials.

The role of public libraries in providing Internet resources to the public also continued to increase. According to the report, the availability of Internet-ready computer terminals in public libraries doubled over the course of the decade.”

Press release: http://www.imls.gov/library_visits_at_historic_high.aspx

Report: https://harvester.census.gov/imls/pubs/pls/index.asp

IMLS: http://www.imls.gov/

2009 Public Libraries Survey Report Now Available

The 2009 Public Libraries Survey report has been released by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). See the report at: https://harvester.census.gov/imls/pubs/Publications/pls2009.pdf.

Based on data from public libraries in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, highlights from the 2009 Public Library Survey (PLS) include:

   * Visitation and circulation per capita have both increased in public libraries over the past 10 years. Per capita visitation increased 5 percent from the prior year. Visitation and circulation were highest in suburban public libraries.

   * The number of public libraries has increased over the past 10 years. However, this growth has been outpaced by changes in the population.

   * The nature and composition of collections in U.S. public libraries is changing, indicating the more varied types of materials found in modern public libraries. Although the volume of print materials has decreased over the past 10 years, collections overall continue to grow because of increases in the number of audio, video, and electronic book materials.

   * The role of public libraries in providing Internet resources to the public continues to increase. The availability of Internet-ready computer terminals in public libraries has doubled over the past 10 years. Internet PC use has also increased.

   * Public libraries have increased their program offerings to meet increased demand and to allow for more individualized attention through smaller class sizes. This is particularly true of public libraries in rural areas, where the number of programs per capita and attendance per capita are both higher than the national average.

IMLS Research PLS web page: http://www.imls.gov/research/public_libraries_in_the_united_states_survey.aspx    

Pew Research Center Announces New Public Library Research Initiative

The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project has received funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study the role of the public library in the digital age. Over a three year period, they will conduct national surveys, surveys of library patrons, and focus groups to assess library use and preferences in the midst of the changing digital landscape.

You can find more information about this initiative at http://pewinternet.org/Press-Releases/2011/Gates.aspx.

Page 8 of 24« First...678910...20...Last »

POPULAR RESOURCES

  • Public Library Statistics & Profiles
    Dive into annual statistics from the Colorado Public Library Annual Report using our interactive tool, results tailored to trustees, and state totals and averages.
  • School Library Impact Studies
    School libraries have a profound impact on student achievement. Explore studies about this topic by LRS and other researchers in our comprehensive guide.
  • Fast Fact Reports
    Looking for a quick rundown of library research? Check out our Fast Facts, which highlight research and statistics about various library topics.

LIBRARYJOBLINE

See more @ LibraryJobline.org

ABOUT

LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Staff & Contact Info