Archive for the School Category

2007-2008 Preliminary School Library Statistics Released

The 2007-08 Preliminary School Library Statistics are now available from our school statistics page. This year, a record 819 schools responded to the survey. Take a look at the statistics and school library profiles to see how your school library stacks up.

Zeth
lietzau_z@cde.state.co.us

New Fast Facts: AskColorado Customer Satisfaction High

The results of the 2006 AskColorado Customer Satisfaction survey are examined in this fast facts. Since its inception, AskColorado has steadily increased both in number of user sessions and customer satisfaction levels. To read this fast facts go to http://www.lrs.org/documents/fastfacts/255_AskCO.pdf

National Report on School Library Programs Released

AASL announced yesterday the release of “School Libraries Count! A National Survey of School Library Media Programs 2007″ an annual survey of school libraries.

From ALA website:

AASL releases report on first longitudinal survey

CHICAGO – The American Association of School Librarians (AASL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), has just released the results of its first longitudinal survey, School Libraries Count!

The survey, conducted January-March 2007, gathered data in a number of areas, including library staff, collections, technology, class visits and budgets. AASL will be using the data to develop tools to help library media specialists advocate at the local, state and national level.

“In a time of budget cuts and confusion about the role of library media specialists,” said AASL president Sara Kelly Johns, “it is more critical than ever that both the profession and educational decision-makers understand the state of the nation’s school library media programs.”

The survey will be conducted annually and will result in a longitudinal series that will provide data on the health of the nation’s school library media programs. The second survey is scheduled to open at the 2008 ALA Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia.

Nancy Everhart, chair of the AASL Research and Statistics Committee, said, “The data from this survey will be valuable to researchers and practitioners alike. Researchers can use it to support further studies, and practitioners can use it to compare their programs to national benchmarks.”

More about the study: http://www.ala.org/ala/aasl/slcsurvey.cfm

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

NCES Reports on Literacy Among 4th-Graders in U.S. and Internationally

National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) just released, “The Reading Literacy of U.S. Fourth-Grade Students in an International Context Results From the 2001 and 2006 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).”

According to this report, “On average, U.S. fourth-graders scored higher than their peers worldwide, with average scores higher than the PIRLS scale average (540 vs. 500), and a greater percentage of U.S. students reaching each achievement benchmark compared to the international median percentage…

The average score for U.S. students was:
* higher than the average score in 22 education systems
* lower than 10 education systems and
* not significantly different from 12 education systems.”

Full report: http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2008017
Information about PIRLS: http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/pirls/index.asp
NCES: http://nces.ed.gov/index.asp

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

New Fellows at LRS!

LRS would like to announce and welcome our three new Library and Information Science Research Fellows from the University of Denver.

Regina Avila
Myntha Cuffy
Amanda Rybin

They will be assisting with various projects and topics including literacy, public, academic and school libraries.

~Daphne
eastburn_d@cde.state.co.us

2006 State Library Report Published by IMLS

WASHINGTON, DC–The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) issued its first library statistics report on state library agencies in the 50 states and the District of Columbia for state fiscal year (FY) 2006. The State Library Agency Report for FY 2006 includes a wide array of information on topics such as libraries’ Internet access, services, collections, staff, and revenue, and is used by state and federal policymakers, researchers, and others…

For more information on the Library Statistics Program, visit: http://www.imls.gov/statistics.

The report is available in PDF format at: http://harvester.census.gov/imls/pubs/stla/index.asp.

From IMLS Press Release
November 16, 2007
————————————————

Note, the reports from previous years were published by NCES.

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

Return on Investment Resources for Everyone…Really!

Whether you’re a public library director or–like me–a public library user, there is a return on investment (ROI) resource for you. Check out the…

CALCULATORS
Personal ROI Calculator
This online tool calculates the individual estimated return on investment for the Colorado public library of your choice. Other states have done ROI calculators, but not like this one!

Do you work in a public library? Well, this calculator can be customized for your library’s website. See DPL’s at: http://www.denverlibrary.org/news/dplnews/roi_calculator.html (it is also linked from their homepage). Or if you prefer, it can be a direct link from your library’s website. Link to the calculator on the LRS website and your library’s name can be pre-filled in the drop-down box. Either way, it can be a fun, yet powerful tool to demonstrate the dollar-and-cents value of your library.

Library ROI Calculator
This tool estimates the ROI for your library using a peer-based return on investment calculator.

OTHER RESOURCES
At the CAL Conference last week, Zeth and I did a presentation on the ROI study. The PowerPoint presentation and other resources we discussed can be found on the ROI page.

Other resources on the ROI page include individual reports for participating libraries, newspaper articles, and links to other studies.

Zeth also recently added a function called “LRS Conversation” so that you can share your comments online about the ROI study or the personal ROI calculator. We look forward to reading what you have to say!

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

LRS Activities at CAL 2007

As usual the Annual CAL Conference is packed with LRS activities. Please join us for…

Booth – Friday, November 9, 8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 10, 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Chat with LRS staff at our booth (#8) in State Library “wing” of the exhibits.

Reception – Thursday, November 8, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
20 Years…and still counting! Prior to the opening keynote address by Nancy Pearl, the Library Research Service will host a reception celebrating its 20th anniversary.

Session – Friday, November 9 at 10:15 a.m.
“What’s It Worth to You? A Return-on-Investment Study of Selected Colorado Public Libraries”

Awards Dinner – Friday, November 9 at 5:30 p.m.
Keith Lance, former Director of the Library Research Service, will be receiving the Career Achievement Award.

Career Fair – Saturday, November 10 at 4:30 p.m.
LRS will be at the Career Fair to provide information about LibraryJobline.org and how it can help both employers and employees.

Hope to see you there!
~Nicolle

Conference info: http://www.cal-webs.org/conference.html

School Library Survey Deadline Extended

The deadline for completing the 2007-08 school library survey has been extended. If you haven’t had the chance to complete it yet, you now have until November 21 to do so. Help us provide a more complete picture of what school libraries are doing for Colorado’s children by completing the survey at http://www.lrs.org/slsurvey.

Zeth
lietzau_z@cde.state.co.us

Who Knew? Banned Books and Book Burning Fun Facts

In 2006, there were a total of 63 challenges to books, materials, events, and exhibits in Colorado public libraries. This was the lowest number of challenges since 2003. Of the 115 public libraries in the state, 23 had a challenge during the year. And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson was the title most often named in a challenge.
Source: http://www.lrs.org/pub_stats.php

The first Index of Prohibited Books was drawn up by order of Pope Paul IV in 1559. The lists were issued 20 times through the centuries by different popes, the last issued as recently as 1948, and finally suppressed in 1966.
Source: http://www.beaconforfreedom.org/about_project/history.html

The origin of the term censor in English can be traced to the office of censor established in Rome in 443 BC. In Rome, as in the ancient Greek communities, the ideal of good governance included shaping the character of the people. Hence, censorship would have been regarded as an honorable task.
Sources: http://www.beaconforfreedom.org/about_project/history.html and http://encyclopedia.farlex.com/censor+(magistrate)

The first recorded book burning in the United States was in 1650. William Pynchon’s A Meritorious Price of Our Redemption was ordered destroyed by a court because the religious publication contained “errors and heresies.” The book was burned by the public executioner.
Source: http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/commentary.aspx?id=2264

Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Boccaccio’s Decameron, Defoe’s Moll Flanders, and various editions of The Arabian Nights were all banned for decades from the U.S. mail under the Comstock Law of 1873. Officially known as the Federal Anti-Obscenity Act, this law banned the mailing of “lewd”, “indecent”, “filthy”, or “obscene” materials. The Comstock laws, while now unenforced, remain for the most part on the books today; the Telecommunications Reform Bill of 1996 even specifically applied some of them to computer networks.
Source: http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/banned-books.html

50 years ago Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti contacted the ACLU to defend the publication of Howl. U.S. Customs officials had seized the books, stating, “You wouldn’t want your children to come across it.” A state court judge ruled that the poem could not be suppressed as obscene by local authorities.

In 2007, fearing repercussions from the FCC, in a New York radio station decided against airing Howl on the 50th anniversary, choosing to stream the poem on its web site instead.
Sources: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/04/books/04howl.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

http://www.aclu-wa.org/library_files/A%20History%20of%20Fighting%20Censorship.pdf

The ALA Office of Intellectual Freedom reports there were more than 3,000 attempts to remove books from schools and public libraries between 2000 and 2005. J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series tops the list of the most challenged books of the 21st century. Source: http://www.ala.org/ala/oif/bannedbooksweek/bbwlinks/topten2000to2005.htm

The Lorax by: Dr. Seuss was banned in the Laytonville, California School District on grounds that this book “criminalizes the forestry industry.”
Source: http://library.dixie.edu/new/whybanned.html

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee was banned as recently as August 2001, in Oklahoma for “racially charged language.” It was also banned from the Lindale, Tex. advanced placement English reading list (1996) because the book “conflicted with the values of the community.” Also challenged at the Warren, Ind. Township schools (1981), because the book “represents institutionalized racism under the guise of ‘good literature’.” Also challenged–and temporarily banned–in Eden Valley, Minn. (1977).
Sources: http://library.dixie.edu/new/whybanned.html http://title.forbiddenlibrary.com/

The Intellectual Freedom Committee of the Colorado Association of Libraries has information on how libraries can deal with challenges and other important information:

http://www.cal-webs.org/ifhandbook.html

For more information about banned books visit:

Banned Book timeline

http://www.thebookstandard.com/bookstandard/news/global/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1001181785

American Library Association

http://www.ala.org/ala/oif/bannedbooksweek/bannedbooksweek.htm

And finally a few quotes to end our Who Knew about Banned Books:

“Books and ideas are the most effective weapons against intolerance and ignorance.”
– Lyndon Baines Johnson, February 11, 1964

“Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? – Who will watch the watchers?”
– Juvenal

Page 9 of 16« First...7891011...Last »

POPULAR RESOURCES

  • Public Library Statistics & Profiles
    Dive into annual statistics from the Colorado Public Library Annual Report using our interactive tool, results tailored to trustees, and state totals and averages.
  • School Library Impact Studies
    School libraries have a profound impact on student achievement. Explore studies about this topic by LRS and other researchers in our comprehensive guide.
  • Fast Fact Reports
    Looking for a quick rundown of library research? Check out our Fast Facts, which highlight research and statistics about various library topics.

LIBRARYJOBLINE

See more @ LibraryJobline.org

ABOUT

LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Staff & Contact Info