Archive for the Uncategorized Category

The Future of the Book 60-Second Survey Results

Last winter, LRS posted a 60-Second Survey on “The Future of the Book.” More than 1,300 people responded, with nearly 950 leaving additional comments about their thoughts on the topic.  With all that information, we were able to write two Fast Facts providing analysis of both the results and the comments.

The comments proved to be one of the most interesting aspects of the survey, revealing passionate and philosophical thoughts on the future of paper and electronic books. Six common themes emerged as influences on future format choices: the existence of multiple formats, technological advantages, emotional/aesthetic appeal of paper books, content, cost, and change over time/generation. The first Fast Facts addresses results and comments related to cost and technological advantages of paper versus electronic formats, while the second report discusses the remaining comment categories and how they related to the type of library in which survey respondents worked and whether they owned an e-reader.

~ Jamie H.

LRS Welcomes Two New Staff Members

Linda Hofschire is the new Research Analyst at the Library Research Service. Previously she worked as a social science researcher in the fields of Mass Communication and Education, designing and implementing surveys and analyzing statistics. She recently received her Master’s degree in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois.

Dave Hodgins is our new Data Coordinator and Web Developer and comes to LRS from the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, where he was Assistant Professor and Access Services Librarian.  Dave’s research interests include library web design and development and the application of new and emerging technologies to traditional library services.

We are all very excited to welcome our new colleagues to LRS and the State Library and look forward to exploring new library research territory with them.

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

Public Libraries & the Internet – Issue Briefs

Using data from the national Public Library Funding & Technology Access Study, issues briefs from the Center for Library & Information Innovation in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland include the following four topics.

Public Libraries and Broadband: http://clii.umd.edu/sites/default/Briefs/BroadbandBrief10July10.pdf

Public Libraries and Community Access: http://clii.umd.edu/sites/default/Briefs/CommunityAccessBrief10July10.pdf

Public Libraries and E-government: http://clii.umd.edu/sites/default/Briefs/EgovBrief10July10.pdf

Public Libraries and Employment: http://clii.umd.edu/sites/default/Briefs/EmploymentBrief10July10.pdf

Issue Briefs: http://www.plinternetsurvey.org:1976/?q=node/17

Full survey results report, available at www.plinternetsurvey.org.

2008 Public Library Survey Report Released: Library Use Up–Way Up–In The Last 10 Years

IMLS recently published the 2008 Public Libraries Survey Report: http://harvester.census.gov/imls/pubs/pls/index.asp.

An analysis of the data shows that nationally public library visits and circulation went up 20% from 1999 to 2000 while staff numbers stay the same: http://www.imls.gov/news/2010/063010.shtm

Fast Facts: More Job Seekers, Fewer Jobs

A new Fast Facts is up!  More Job Seekers, Fewer Jobs: Findings from Library Jobline, Year Three” reports trends found in LibraryJobline.org postings from 2007-2009.  While the number of job postings drastically decreased as the economy struggled, the number of job seekers increased, making the field more competitive.  Click on the title above or visit the Fast Facts page to read more!

– Jamie H.

Study Shows How Americans Benefit from Internet Access at Libraries

Released at PLA this week, the study Opportunity for All: How the American Public Benefits from Internet Access at U.S. Libraries shows what most librarians already knew—patrons are using the library for more than checking out paper books.  The study is already generating buzz outside of the library profession and is being picked-up by news outlets around the country. (I saw it this morning on the local news.)

From IMLS:
Nearly one-third of Americans age 14 or older – roughly 77 million people – used a public library computer or wireless network to access the Internet in the past year, according to a national report released today. In 2009, as the nation struggled through a recession, people relied on library technology to find work, apply for college, secure government benefits, learn about critical medical treatments, and connect with their communities.

The report, Opportunity for All: How the American Public Benefits from Internet Access at U.S. Libraries, is based on the first, large-scale study of who uses public computers and Internet access in public libraries, the ways library patrons use this free technology service, why they use it, and how it affects their lives. It was conducted by the University of Washington Information School and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Full report : http://tascha.washington.edu/usimpact.

For broadcast-quality footage, high-resolution still photography, and information about the foundation’s work, please visit: www.gatesfoundation.org/press-room/Pages/news-market.aspx.

 ~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

LRS is searching for a new DU Research Fellow

We’ve recently watched one of our University of Denver Research Fellows graduate and move on to her professional career – good luck Briana, you’ll be missed. But as one door closes another opens, and now we’ve started the process of hiring a new Research Fellow. As the result of our partnership with DU’s LIS program which allows us to employ 3-4 current DU LIS students as Research Fellows. More information about the Fellowship is available at http://www.lrs.org/fellowship.php.

If you are a current student in the DU LIS program and think the Fellowship sounds like a good opportunity, or if you know someone in the program who you think would be a great fit for us, our online application form and instructions are available at http://www.lrs.org/rfapp.

-Zeth
lietzau_z@cde.state.co.us

News about American Libraries

From the folks at ALA:

1. Our weekly e-newsletter, American Libraries Direct, is now available to anyone who wants to sign up for it, not just ALA members. The sign-up form, as well as the FAQ, is at http://www.ala.org/ala/alonline/aldirect/aldirect.cfm .

2. American Libraries has launched its own blog, AL Inside Scoop, http://www.al.ala.org/insidescoop/ . Editor-in-chief Leonard Kniffel offers an insider’s view of goings-on at ALA headquarters and what hot topics ALA staffers are talking about in the hallways. Associate Editor Greg Landgraf offers his perspective from “the lower floors” of what many see as the ALA ivory tower.

3. Login is no longer required to view the current issue of the American Libraries print magazine online (in PDF format), or to view the archives, which date back to the January 2003 issue. Go directly to http://www.ala.org/ala/alonline/alonlineebrary/alonlineebrary.cfm . First-time viewers will need to install the ebrary reader to view issues. To download, go to http://site.ebrary.com/lib/ala/Download . Firefox 3 users installing the reader for the first time will need a workaround, http://www.ebrary.com/kb/users/ff3install.jsp , to make the ebrary reader work with their browser.

Zeth
lietzau_z@cde.state.co.us

LRS.org turns a decade!

Almost exactly 10 years ago, LRS.org went live. Yes, we’ve inhabited cyberspace that long – how do you think we got such a great URL? In those 10 years, our website has received about 16 million hits from around 2.5 million visitors. We’ve also redefined ourselves a few times. Here’s what what we looked like in one of our original incarnations (thanks Archive.org!):

We moved to the current look at the beginning of 2005, which suggests it’s high time we rethink our web presence. Look for something new next summer, and in the meantime feel free to give us advice – in the comments or via email.

Zeth
lietzau_z@cde.state.co.us

New Research Fellows

The LRS is going through a bit of a transition, as we welcome a brand new set of Research Fellows from the University of Denver. Briana Hovendick, Sean Lamborne, and Jamie Archuleta all joined our ranks in the last few weeks. It’ll be exciting to move forward with our new corps. Join me in welcoming them to the crew.

Zeth
lietzau_z@cde.state.co.us

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LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

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