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Early Literacy Information on Colorado Public Library Websites

Our new Fast Facts presents the results of a study of the early literacy information available on Colorado public library websites. The findings indicated that most libraries broadly referenced early literacy information on their websites, but fewer referenced early literacy skills, discussed the long-term benefits of early literacy, or provided information on the importance of reading aloud.

The Fast Facts also links to an early literacy resource guide provided by the Colorado State Library that libraries can use on their own websites. With the 2013 One Book 4 Colorado event coming this spring, this resource may be particularly useful to libraries as they develop materials and plan activities for this event.

 

 

The Public Computer Centers Project: Coloradans Benefit from Access and Training

Through a $3.3 million, two year project that began in spring 2011, the Colorado State Library is overseeing the installation of 88 new and enhanced Public Computer Centers (PCCs) throughout Colorado. These PCCs provide internet access and computer training to foster broadband adoption. In 2012, LRS surveyed more than 7,300 PCC users to determine the impacts the PCCs are having on their lives. The results showed that the top outcomes of respondents who used the PCCs during open lab times were to communication with someone (52%), look for employment (38%), and use the printer, scanner, or fax (33%). Top outcomes of computer class attendees included getting better at using the computer (68%), the internet (49%), and software (38%) after taking a computer class. One respondent commented: “Probably the most valuable resource, dollar for dollar, available to community. I have found jobs…researched…located tax information, and have done school work over the years. Thank you!!”

Highlights of the study can be found in our one-page infographic, or for all the details, see our Closer Look Report.

2010 National Public Library Survey Results Released

From the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS):

IMLS 2010 Public Library Survey Results Announced: Libraries doing more with less – Local government taking larger funding role  Press Release

Highlights from the Report

Public Library Services and Operations

  • Public libraries offered 3.75 million programs to the public in FY 2010, which amounts to an average of at least one program a day for every library system in the country. The majority of these programs (61.5%) are designed for children. Attendance at programs has continued to rise, indicating an increased demand for these services.
  • Public libraries circulated 2.46 billion materials in FY 2010, the highest circulation in 10 years, representing a continued increasing trend. Circulation of children’s materials has increased by 28.3 percent in the last 10 years and comprises over one-third of all materials circulated in public libraries.
  • The composition of public library collections has changed dramatically in recent years. While books in print continue to dominate the physical portion of the collection, making up 87.1 percent of the total in FY 2010, the share of non-print materials, including audio and video materials and electronic books, has increased. The number of e-books has tripled since FY 2003. In FY 2010, there were 18.50 million e-books available for circulation.
  • Public access computer use continued to be one of the fastest growing services in public libraries. In FY 2010, public libraries reported a computer use rate of more than one use for every five visits to the library. Public libraries have responded to demand by increasing access, doubling the number of public computers in the past 10 years.
  • Physical visits to libraries decreased 1.1 percent in 2010. (Note: the survey does not collect data on online visits or transactions of public libraries.) Physical visits remain strong with an overall 10-year increase of 32.7 percent from FY 2001-FY 2010. On average, Americans visited a public library 5.3 times per year, a ten-year increase of 21.7 percent.

Public Library Resources

  • Public libraries had $11.3 billion in revenue in FY 2010, a decrease of 3.5 percent from FY 2009, after adjusting for inflation. Although local governments have generally been the largest source of revenue for public libraries, they have had to take on an even larger role as state support declined over 10 years.
  • Public libraries reported operating expenditures of $10.77 billion dollars in FY 2010, the first decrease since FY 2001. Although expenditures across all U.S. public libraries were $36.18 per capita, per-capita expenditures varied greatly by state, with spending as low as $15.99 and as high as $67.78.

 Public Library Workforce

  • The recession has had an impact on the public library workforce, which has decreased by 6,385 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) staff since FY 2008, a decrease of 3.9 percent. Staff-related expenditures were $7.21 billion, 67.0 percent of public library expenses in FY 2010.
  • Librarians made up one-third of all library staff. Although the majority of these librarians hold a Master’s degree in Library Science from a program accredited by the American Library Association (ALA-MLS), only half of all libraries reported having a librarian with an ALA-MLS on staff.

A copy of the FY 2010 Public Library Survey can be accessed online at: http://www.imls.gov/research/public_libraries_in_the_us_fy_2010_report.aspx

Blog post by IMLS Director Susan Hildreth: http://blog.imls.gov/?p=2645

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Questions? Comments? Contact Nicolle Steffen at: steffen_n at cde.state.co.us

New Fast Facts: Colorado School Libraries and the Use of Web Technologies, 2011-2012

Our newest Fast Facts uses data from the 2011-2012 Colorado School Library Survey to assess the degree to which public school libraries with endorsed librarians use web technologies. The results indicate that more school libraries offer basic web technologies (e.g., a website, OPAC) than Web 2.0-related technologies, such as wikis and Facebook. Additionally, use of these technologies varies in accordance with the grade level and enrollment of the school served. Middle schools are most likely to use Web 2.0 technologies, while school libraries at schools with more than 1,000 students are most likely to offer most of the technologies noted in the survey.

~Rebecca

New Fast Facts: 21st-Century Instruction Strategies in Colorado School Libraries

Using data from the 2011-12 Colorado School Library Survey, our new Fast Facts examines how often endorsed school librarians engage in activities that foster students’ development of 21st-century skills. The results indicate that the most frequent activity across Colorado public school libraries with endorsed librarians, regardless of grade level or enrollment, was “teach students to use digital resources”; 7 in 10 respondents reported helping students develop this skill at least once a week. About 3 in 5 respondents reported that they help students apply critical thinking skills (61%) and use technology to organize and share information (59%) at least once a week.

Annual School Library Survey Deadline Has Been Extended

The deadline for completing the 2012-13 Colorado School Library Survey has been extended to November 30, 2012. Participation by all public school libraries is vital! If you have not yet responded to the survey, it can be accessed at http://www.lrs.org/slsurvey.

School librarians–your responses really do matter, and we hope you will take the time to complete the survey!  The results provide important information about the state of school libraries in Colorado that school library staff and administrators can use for advocacy, planning, evaluating, and budgeting.

For questions regarding the survey, or to obtain your username and password, feel free to call Library Research Service at 303-866-6900 or email lrs@lrs.org to get your information.

~Linda

New research from Pew Internet focuses on the reading/library habits of young Americans

Pew Internet has released their latest findings from their multi-year library research project. Highlights of these findings, which focused on the reading and library habits of young Americans, included:

  • 4 in 5 young Americans ( ages 16-29) read a book in the past year
  • 1 in 5 read an e-book
  • 1 in 10 listened to an audiobook
  • 3 in 5 used the library
  • Young Americans are more likely to read e-books on a cell phone or computer than on an e-reader
  • Nearly half (47%) of young Americans read long-form e-content (books, magazines, newspapers)

When further subdivided by age, Pew researchers found that:

  • High schoolers (16-17) were most likely of the subgroups to have used the library in the past year, to have checked out print books, and/or to have received research assistance
  • College-aged adults (18-24) had the highest overall reading rates
  • Adults in their late twenties (25-29) expressed the greatest appreciation for libraries in general

For more details, see http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2012/10/23/younger-americans-reading-and-library-habits/.

~Linda

2012-13 Colorado School Library Survey Now Open

Letters have been sent to public school libraries throughout the state announcing the opening of the 2012-13 Colorado School Library Survey. It can be accessed at http://www.lrs.org/slsurvey. The data gathered in the annual school library survey provides library professionals with important information for planning, evaluating, and budgeting. In addition, the survey’s results serve as the basis for studies that demonstrate the impact of school libraries on student achievement.

Login information is included in the letter, but if you haven’t received your letter and would like to get started, feel free to call LRS at 303-866-6900 or email lrs@lrs.org to get your information.

~Linda

2011 Colorado Public Library Statistics Finalized

The final Census edit checks are done and I want to thank everyone who helped with annotations and corrections. Of course, the completion of the edit check process means the 2011 Public Library Annual Report data has been finalized and published to LRS.org.

You can access the data in several ways…

1) Colorado Public Library Interactive Statistics (LRS-i): This tool allows for quick extraction of public library data for customized reports. Main page: http://www.lrs.org/public/stats.php

2) Colorado Public Library Statistics:  Annual library-by-library data for Colorado’s public libraries in PDF and Excel format, including Salary Tables, Input-Output Measures and State Totals and Averages. 2011 data: http://www.lrs.org/public/cannedstats.php?year=2011

3) Historic Colorado Public Library Interactive Statistics: Similar to the Public Library Interactive Statistics, this tool extracts time-series data (as far back as 1987) for a single library or a group of libraries. Main page:  http://www.lrs.org/public/historic/

Coming soon is an update of the resort category for libraries. (Thanks to Claudine for the reminder.)

~Nicolle

Colorado’s Public Computer Centers: Bridging the Great Digital Divide

In September 2010, the Colorado State Library (CSL) secured a Broadband Technology Opportunity Program (BTOP) grant through the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This grant funded 50 grantees to build or enhance Public Computer Centers (PCCs) in 88 high-need urban and rural communities in Colorado with high poverty rates, ethnic diversity, low broadband penetration, and/or limited access to public computers. Our new Fast Facts series provides highlights of the CSL BTOP project’s first year, including:

Visit CSL’s BTOP website to learn more about the project.

 

 

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LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

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