News

2010 Academic Library Statistics Published

This week the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) published Academic Libraries: 2010 First Look a biennial report that  summarizes services, staff, collections, and expenditures of academic libraries in 2- and 4-year, degree-granting postsecondary institutions in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

 Highlights from the report include:

• Academic libraries held approximately 158.7 million e-books and about 1.8 million electronic reference sources and aggregation services at the end of FY 2010.

• Academic libraries spent approximately $152.4 million for electronic books, serial backfiles, and other materials in FY 2010. Expenditures for electronic current serial subscriptions totaled about $1.2 billion.

• During FY 2010, some 72 percent of academic libraries reported that they supported virtual reference services.

• Academic libraries reported 88,943 full-time equivalent (FTE) staff working in academic libraries during the fall of 2010.

To view the full report please visit
http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2012365

Library Visits at Historic High — Visits Top 1.5 Billion

In a press release issued today, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) confirmed what most public library staff already knew—library visits are up, way up. In the last decade public libraries were visited 1.59 billion times, a 24.4% increase in visits per capita and total visits increase of almost 40%.

From IMLS:  “The Institute’s analysis of the data showed that per capita visits and circulation rose in the century’s first decade. The number of public libraries increased during that period but not enough to keep pace with the rise in population. Library staffing remained stable, though the percentage of public libraries with degreed and accredited librarians increased.

The report also found that the nature and composition of collections in U.S. public libraries is changing, indicating that library collections are becoming more varied. Although the volume of print materials decreased over the 10 years studied, collections overall continued to grow because of increases in the number of audio, video, and electronic book materials.

The role of public libraries in providing Internet resources to the public also continued to increase. According to the report, the availability of Internet-ready computer terminals in public libraries doubled over the course of the decade.”

Press release: http://www.imls.gov/library_visits_at_historic_high.aspx

Report: https://harvester.census.gov/imls/pubs/pls/index.asp

IMLS: http://www.imls.gov/

Deadline for the 2011-12 Colorado School Library Survey Has Been Extended

The deadline for completing the 2011-12 Colorado School Library Survey has been extended to November 30, 2011. Participation by all public school libraries is vital! If you have not yet responded to the survey, it can be accessed at http://www.lrs.org/slsurvey.

We have made substantial revisions to the survey based on respondents’ comments to better reflect the current state of school libraries, and we look forward to getting the input of all Colorado public school librarians! The data gathered in the annual school library survey provides library professionals with important information for planning, evaluating, and budgeting. For questions regarding the survey, or to obtain your username and password, feel free to call Library Research Service at 303-866-6900 or email lrs@lrs.org to get your information.

~Linda

2009 Public Libraries Survey Report Now Available

The 2009 Public Libraries Survey report has been released by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). See the report at: https://harvester.census.gov/imls/pubs/Publications/pls2009.pdf.

Based on data from public libraries in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, highlights from the 2009 Public Library Survey (PLS) include:

   * Visitation and circulation per capita have both increased in public libraries over the past 10 years. Per capita visitation increased 5 percent from the prior year. Visitation and circulation were highest in suburban public libraries.

   * The number of public libraries has increased over the past 10 years. However, this growth has been outpaced by changes in the population.

   * The nature and composition of collections in U.S. public libraries is changing, indicating the more varied types of materials found in modern public libraries. Although the volume of print materials has decreased over the past 10 years, collections overall continue to grow because of increases in the number of audio, video, and electronic book materials.

   * The role of public libraries in providing Internet resources to the public continues to increase. The availability of Internet-ready computer terminals in public libraries has doubled over the past 10 years. Internet PC use has also increased.

   * Public libraries have increased their program offerings to meet increased demand and to allow for more individualized attention through smaller class sizes. This is particularly true of public libraries in rural areas, where the number of programs per capita and attendance per capita are both higher than the national average.

IMLS Research PLS web page: http://www.imls.gov/research/public_libraries_in_the_united_states_survey.aspx    

Pew Research Center Announces New Public Library Research Initiative

The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project has received funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study the role of the public library in the digital age. Over a three year period, they will conduct national surveys, surveys of library patrons, and focus groups to assess library use and preferences in the midst of the changing digital landscape.

You can find more information about this initiative at http://pewinternet.org/Press-Releases/2011/Gates.aspx.

CALCON11: It’s time to think outside the box!

Everyone’s heard of thinking outside the box, right? You know-the ability to break out of unconventional thinking and apply innovative ideas to problem solving. Well, now we invite you to explore ways of thinking outside the survey and using innovative methods to learn about the people who use your library.

Please join us at CALCON11 for:

Beyond the Survey: Innovative Techniques for Learning About Your Patrons

Friday, October 14, 2011, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, Snowberry

We’ll present 10 creative-and often fun-ways to engage your patrons, staff, and community and get the information you need. Bring your ideas, questions, and enthusiasm. We’d like to share our ideas and hear yours.

It’s time to think outside the survey!

~Linda, Lisa, & Nicolle

60% is the magic number!

A magic percentage for public libraries, really. “How is it magic,” you ask. It is the response rate each state must reach in order to have state-level reports from the National Survey of Public Library Funding and Technology Access (PLFTAS). Reports like the State Briefs found here: http://plinternetsurvey.org/advocacy/state-details?id=CO.

Want to be part of the magic?
Take the survey here: http://plftas.pnmi.com/   
Look up you library’s survey id here: http://plftas.pnmi.com/lookup.cfm?CO   
More information here: http://www.plinternetsurvey.org/

This survey provides important information about computer and Internet resources and infrastructure, as well as funding, technology training, and other uses of public libraries, such as providing public access technology centers in their communities. The data from this study has been used in many influential ways, including:

     * U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding the Children’s Internet Protection Act (http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/02-361.ZO.html)

     * U.S. Statistical Abstracts (http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2011/tables/11s1153.pdf)

     *  MSNBC’s “Libraries Lend a Hand in Tough Times” (http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/26184891/vp/31237988#31237988)

     *  NPR’s “Digital Challenges for U.S. Public Libraries” (http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2010/06/21/127990542/digital-challenges-for-u-s-public-libraries)

     * U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services report “Catalyst for Change: LSTA Grants to States Program Activities and the Transformation of Library Services to the Public” (http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2010/06/21/127990542/digital-challenges-for-u-s-public-libraries)

 Have questions, need more information? Please call 301-405-9445 or e-mail ipac.umd@gmail.com for survey support. Survey administrators monitor the support e-mail account from 9 AM – 5 PM (ET), Monday through Friday. For other information and updates, you call follow the survey/report on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/iPAC_UMD.

Thanks.
Nicolle

2011-12 School Library Survey Now Open

Letters have been sent to public school libraries throughout the state announcing the opening of the 2011-12 Colorado School Library Survey. It can be accessed at http://www.lrs.org/slsurvey. We have made substantial revisions to the survey based on respondents’ comments to better reflect the current state of school libraries, and we look forward to getting the input of all Colorado public school librarians! The data gathered in the annual school library survey provides library professionals with important information for planning, evaluating, and budgeting. Login information is included in the letter, but if you haven’t received your letter and would like to get started, feel free to call LRS at 303-866-6900 or email lrs@lrs.org to get your information.

~Linda

New article in Computers in Libraries–U.S. Public Libraries and Web Technologies

We have an article in the September 2011 issue of Computer in Libraries, “U.S. Public Libraries and Web Technologies: What’s Happening Now?”. It highlights the findings from a study about public libraries’ use of Web 2.0 technologies that we released last spring (available as a Closer Look report). Key findings from the study included that:

  • 80% of U.S. public libraries serving LSA populations of 500,000+ had a Facebook account in 2010. More than half (58%) of libraries serving 100,000-499,999 people were on Facebook, as were 56% of libraries serving 25,000-99,999 people.
  • In 2010, 66% of public libraries serving LSA populations of 500,000+ had a Twitter account.
  • Even when controlling for staff and collection expenditures, being an “early adopter” library (i.e., libraries in the top 20% of their population group in terms of Web 2.0 adoption) was a significant predictor of visits, circulation, and program attendance.

Colorado-specific findings from this study are available in a Fast  Facts.

School Library Studies-Next Steps

In response to some questions we’ve received about our School Library Journal article and our future plans for school library research:

The results reported in this article represent the first part of a larger study we are conducting to look at the relationship between school librarian staffing and achievement scores. Our next step is to do a more in-depth analysis of Colorado schools, where we have access to staffing and achievement test data at the building level (the data used for our SLJ article were at the state level). Look for a report of the results in the coming months. We encourage others to pursue this type of research in their state/region.

~Linda

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LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

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