News

Librarian Job Satisfaction Survey

Library Journal’s 2011 Job Satisfaction Survey–Rocked by Recession, Buoyed by Service:  “Budget cuts from coast to coast have turned up the heat, but librarians still love their jobs. Realistically, however, money shortages have reduced advancement opportunities and many feel they’ll have to leave libraries before retiring.”

Read the article at: http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/newslettersnewsletterbucketljxpress/890617-441/lj_2011_job_satisfaction_survey.html.csp

Read about the results from the LRS survey “What is the Value of an MLIS to You?” at: http://www.lrs.org/news/2011/06/14/results-from-the-60-second-survey-what-is-the-value-of-an-mlis-to-you/

2010-2011 Public Library Funding & Technology Access Report Now Available

ALA officially released the 2010-2011 Public Library Funding & Technology Access report: http://www.ala.org/plinternetfunding

The full survey report, including state data, is available at http://plinternetsurvey.org/?q=node/13.  

Also available is a highly shareable executive summary: http://www.ala.org/ala/research/initiatives/plftas/2010_2011/plftas11-execsummary.pdf.  

Results from the 60-Second Survey: What is the Value of an MLIS to You?

Over the last two weeks of May, librarians, library staff, and library school students weighed in on the LRS 60-Second Survey “The Value of an MLIS Degree to you.” Almost 2,500 people from every state and 15 countries, representing all library types, responded. Around 1,300 respondents left comments, sharing additional thoughts on the value of the MLIS degree today.

When asked if they thought their MLIS degree was/is worth the money and time invested in it, just over three-fourths of respondents (76%) agreed or strongly agreed that their degree was worth the investment. Seven percent of respondents disagreed with the statement that their MLIS degree was worth the time and money they invested in it, and another 4 percent strongly disagreed. Ten percent indicated neutral feelings toward the value of their MLIS degree.

My MLIS degree was/is worth the time and money invested in it:*
*3 percent of respondents indicated N/A and the question was skipped by 11 respondents.

Respondents who have had their MLIS degree the longest were more likely to indicate that the time and money invested in the MLIS was worth it. Nine out of ten (92%) of respondents who have had their MLIS for 16+ years agreed or strongly agreed that the degree was worth the time and money they invested in it and only 8 percent disagreed, strongly disagreed, or were neutral. Almost 90 percent of respondents who have had their degrees for 11-15 years agreed or strongly agreed that the investment in the MLIS degree was worth it, as did 80 percent of respondents who have had their degrees for 6-10 years. While over two-thirds of newer professionals agreed or strongly agreed that their investment in the degree was worthwhile, they were less likely to strongly agree and were more likely to select neutral or to disagree or strongly disagree. Respondents who completed their degree 1-5 years ago were the most likely to indicate that the degree was not worth the time and money they invested in it, with 21 percent selecting disagree or strongly disagree.

My MLIS degree was/is worth the time and money invested in it, by when degree was completed:

Survey respondents also indicated whether or not they would recommend pursuing an MLIS degree if asked today. Almost two-thirds of respondents (63%) would recommend pursuing the MLIS degree, with one-fourth of respondents indicating they would “highly recommend” the degree. Close to one in six respondents would not recommend pursuing the degree, and 8 percent would actively dissuade others from pursuing it. Around 14 percent of the respondents said they were not sure if they would recommend the degree if asked.

If asked TODAY, would you recommend pursuing an MLIS degree?
In addition to being more likely to agree that the investment in the MLIS degree was worth it, respondents who have had their degrees the longest were also the most likely to indicate they would recommend pursuing the degree to others, with three-fourths of those who have had their MLIS for 16+ years indicating they would recommend or highly recommend the degree. Around two-thirds (65%) of those who have had their MLIS for 11-15 years and 6-10 years would also recommend or highly recommend the degree to others. Those who have had their degree for 1-5 years were the least likely to highly recommend or recommend the degree (49%) and were also the most likely to indicate that they would not recommend (22%) or actively dissuade (13%) others from pursuing an MLIS.

If asked TODAY, would you recommend pursuing an MLIS degree, by when degree was completed:

Stay tuned for a more in-depth report on the survey results, including a comparison with the 2008 survey results and analysis of the comments left by respondents. Until then, we’d love to hear your thoughts so far – please leave any comments below!

~Lisa

We’re on Twitter!

Did you know that LRS is now on Twitter? We use our account to highlight new research and statistics from the field, share resources for libraries to use for advocacy and decision-making purposes, get feedback about LIS trends and hot topics, and more!  This is also a great way to communicate with us if you have a quick question or comment. Come join the conversation–you can find us at @LRS_CO.

~Linda

Public Libraries Search and Compare Tool Updated

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The Institute of Museum and Library Services just announced the Public Libraries Search and Compare tools have been updated with the national FY 2009 Public Library Survey unimputed suppressed data.

Search tool: http://harvester.census.gov/imls/search/index.asp

Compare tool:  http://harvester.census.gov/imls/compare/index.asp

Public Libraries and the Use of Web Technologies: What’s Happening in Colorado?

LRS’s newest Fast Facts, “Web 2.0 and Colorado Public Libraries: 2010 Update,” highlights the Colorado findings from our 2010 nationwide study of U.S. public libraries and their use of web technologies. Colorado’s results generally mirrored those of libraries nationwide, although it is ahead of its peers in areas such as web presence among libraries that serve less than 10,000 people, and the availability of chat reference service and RSS feeds. One in 3 (34%) Colorado public libraries has a Facebook account, about the same proportion as libraries nationwide. For more information, you can access the Fast Facts at: http://www.lrs.org/documents/fastfacts/296_WebTech2010.pdf. Or, to view the complete results of the study, as well as the first iteration of the study (from 2008), go to http://www.lrs.org/public/webtech/

Fast Facts: Colorado Library Job Trends

There appears to be more competition than ever for Colorado’s library jobs, based on recent activity on LibraryJobline.org. A new Fast Facts about the jobs posted on the site over the past four years has just been published: “Colorado’s Library Job Climate: 2007-2010: Insights from LibraryJobline.org” highlights trends in total job postings, salaries, degree requirements, and the most popular jobs from the site. Job postings are up slightly from 2009, but drastically more people are viewing them, and part-time, temporary positions continue to replace full-time, permanent ones. Click on the title above to view the full report.

~Julie

New 60-Second Survey: What is the Value of an MLIS to you?

In 2008 Library Research Service launched our first 60-second survey, “What is the Value of an MLIS to You?,” in response to lively discussions about this topic on various listservs. Close to 2,000 library professionals weighed in, with over 1,000 leaving thoughtful comments about the MLIS degree. Three years later, as libraries and the environments in which they serve continue to change and evolve, LRS wondered how has the value of an MLIS fared? LRS has launched a new 60-Second Survey on the value of an MLIS to you. Do you feel your MLIS degree was/is worth the time and money invested in it? If asked today, would you recommend pursuing an MLIS degree? You tell us.

Edited to add: Thank you for your interest! The survey is now closed. Preliminary results will be posted to the blog in early June.

Many thanks!
Lisa

2010 Public Library Annual Report – Preliminary Data Posted

The preliminary data from the Public Library Annual Report is now available on LRS.org. See Colorado Public Library Statistics and Profiles at: http://www.lrs.org/pub_stats.php.

For access to Colorado Public Library Interactive Statistics (LRS-i), use the new interface at: http://www.lrs.org/public/stats.php?year=2010.

For Input-Output Measures, see: http://www.lrs.org/public/cannedstats.php?year=2010.

Over the next 4 weeks I will be conducting second-round edit checks before sending the data to Census for processing and more edit checks. If you have corrections or changes to your library’s data, just drop me an email or give me a call and we can make any necessary modifications.

Note, this year we used the 2010 Census data, as reported by the State Demography Office, for the legal service area (LSA) population figures. Compared with non-census years, some library jurisdictions will see a greater change in their LSA population in census years. Typically, we see population count corrections in census years because in the intervening years between the censuses, population counts are estimated.

Corrections? Problems? Questions?  Please contact me at: steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

~Nicolle

New Closer Look Report: U.S. Public Libraries and the Use of Web Technologies 2010

Libraries’ online presence is a constant topic of conversation, with anecdotal insights dominating the discussion. A broader picture of what libraries across the country – and throughout Colorado – are doing with web technologies and web 2.0 tools is a little harder to find.  That’s where LRS stepped in with a paint brush.

In spring 2010, LRS staff repeated its observational study (first conducted in 2008) of U.S. Public Libraries and the Use of Web Technologies. We visited the websites of 689 public libraries in the U.S., including all those in Colorado, to see what they were doing with their web presences. Our final report is now ready for your perusal, with some interesting findings related to the use of both older and newer web technologies, as well as the success of the libraries that have adopted these tools.

For starters, take a look at libraries’ use of Facebook.  It’s common knowledge that the social networking site is popular around the world, but just two years ago public libraries in the United States had hardly begun to investigate its potential as a way to reach their patrons.  Now, 1 in 3 public libraries across the country (32%) have a Facebook account.  The chart below shows how much Facebook use has increased in libraries of all sizes since 2008.

While social media sites have taken off in public libraries, adoption of other tools has slowed. Basic web services such as online account access showed little increase, as did email reference and blogs. Chat reference is still the most popular virtual reference tool in Colorado, with a much higher percentage of libraries in the state than in the nation offering the service.

It’s interesting to know what libraries are doing to enhance their web offerings, but do their efforts go unrewarded? Based on our analysis of “Early Adopters” – those libraries that scored in the top 20 percent of their population groups on our index of Web 2.0 technology adoption – libraries that were experimenting with these features reported higher numbers for traditional measures of library success, such as visits and circulation (see the chart below). This was true for almost all inputs and outputs – everything from staffing and funding to reference questions and program attendance.

Yes, it is true that overall, Early Adopters enjoyed more resources—human and financial—than non-early adopters, which logically makes it easier for them to invest in more and newer web technologies. But even when controlling for staff and collection expenditures, Early Adopter status was still a significant predictor of higher visits, circulation, and program attendance. Furthermore, libraries that were Early Adopters in the first study experienced greater increases than non-early adopters in visits and circulation between 2008 and 2010.

Check out the full report for more details on what libraries are up to with their websites and online presences:  U.S. Public Libraries and the Use of Web Technologies, 2010. Coming soon is a brief Fast Facts highlighting the Colorado results.  Questions or comments? We’d love to hear them!

~Jamie H.

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LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

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