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LRS is searching for a new DU Research Fellow

We’ve recently watched one of our University of Denver Research Fellows graduate and move on to her professional career – good luck Briana, you’ll be missed. But as one door closes another opens, and now we’ve started the process of hiring a new Research Fellow. As the result of our partnership with DU’s LIS program which allows us to employ 3-4 current DU LIS students as Research Fellows. More information about the Fellowship is available at

If you are a current student in the DU LIS program and think the Fellowship sounds like a good opportunity, or if you know someone in the program who you think would be a great fit for us, our online application form and instructions are available at


News about American Libraries

From the folks at ALA:

1. Our weekly e-newsletter, American Libraries Direct, is now available to anyone who wants to sign up for it, not just ALA members. The sign-up form, as well as the FAQ, is at .

2. American Libraries has launched its own blog, AL Inside Scoop, . Editor-in-chief Leonard Kniffel offers an insider’s view of goings-on at ALA headquarters and what hot topics ALA staffers are talking about in the hallways. Associate Editor Greg Landgraf offers his perspective from “the lower floors” of what many see as the ALA ivory tower.

3. Login is no longer required to view the current issue of the American Libraries print magazine online (in PDF format), or to view the archives, which date back to the January 2003 issue. Go directly to . First-time viewers will need to install the ebrary reader to view issues. To download, go to . Firefox 3 users installing the reader for the first time will need a workaround, , to make the ebrary reader work with their browser.

Zeth turns a decade!

Almost exactly 10 years ago, went live. Yes, we’ve inhabited cyberspace that long – how do you think we got such a great URL? In those 10 years, our website has received about 16 million hits from around 2.5 million visitors. We’ve also redefined ourselves a few times. Here’s what what we looked like in one of our original incarnations (thanks!):

We moved to the current look at the beginning of 2005, which suggests it’s high time we rethink our web presence. Look for something new next summer, and in the meantime feel free to give us advice – in the comments or via email.


New Research Fellows

The LRS is going through a bit of a transition, as we welcome a brand new set of Research Fellows from the University of Denver. Briana Hovendick, Sean Lamborne, and Jamie Archuleta all joined our ranks in the last few weeks. It’ll be exciting to move forward with our new corps. Join me in welcoming them to the crew.


Research Studies at ALA

While I was at ALA, I had the chance to be exposed to several sessions that presented research that is in a very similar vein to what we’re doing here at the LRS. I’ll mention three such studies that I was able to learn about:

The University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill is doing a study that is very close to our hearts – the Workforce Issues in Library & Information Science ( They’re treating it as a two-step process. First, they’ve surveyed LIS graduates from their school dating to 1964, and are currently processing that data. Next, they will be using what they’ve done to attempt to develop a model for career tracking of LIS graduates. It should be interesting to see what they come up with.

Second, Old Dominion University is conducting an exploratory study of the relationship between National Board Certification (NBC) in Library Media and Information Science (LMS) and student academic achievement ( This is well in line with the school library impact studies done by LRS and others found at

Finally, I got to sit in on a session presented by OCLC which discussed their study, “From Awareness to Funding: A study of library support in America” ( They’re analyzing the data from a very large study of library support that found, among many other things, that the library’s most committed funding supporters are not the heaviest library users.

Though all of these studies are still in the data analysis stage at the moment, I look forward to seeing what comes from them.


New Fast Facts: — the first year

The first year of job postings on has been reviewed and shows some interesting trends in library employment.

The data indicate that new library jobs are being created, the requirement for an MLIS varies by library type, and that there is an increase in desire for Spanish-speaking employees.

See the Fast Facts article here:

Comment on the article here:

Regina Avila
Research Fellow
Library Research Service

Literacy and Libraries in Prison

The U.S. Department of Education recently released the report, Literacy Behind Bars: Results from the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy Prison Survey. This report summarizes the findings of the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL) which assessed the English literacy of incarcerated adults. The first assessment since 1992, the 2003 assessment was administered to approximately 1,200 inmates (ages 16 and older) in state and federal prisons, as well as to approximately 18,000 adults (ages 16 and older) living in households. The prison sample is representative of the 1,380,000 adults in prison and the household sample is representative of the 221,020,000 adults in households in 2003. Both the 1992 and 2003 Assessments, define literacy as: “Using printed and written information to function in society, to achieve one’s goals and to develop one’s knowledge and potential.”

The assessment indicates there is a direct link between literacy and participation in certain activities in prison such as reading, using computers, using the library, and being given the opportunity for certain work assignments.

Many prisons have a library that is available to inmates. However, the opportunity for a prisoner to actually use the library is influenced by a variety of factors including; the hours that the library is open, procedures that inmates must go through to request a visit to the library or delivery of books from the library, and the extent and variety of reading materials available. (According to the Directory of State Prison Librarians 2002, 826 state prisons have a librarian. This is approximately 62% of state prisons according to the most recent report on the number of state correctional facilities in the U.S.)

In general, prison inmates who use the library have higher average prose and quantitative literacy than inmates who never use the library. The report explains, “Library use can be related to literacy in two ways; adults who have higher literacy levels may be more likely to want to access the library and find things to read, and adults who use the library and read more frequently may improve their literacy levels.”

This report is available at:

~ Daphne

Special Libraries Page

Librarians who work in special libraries may be interested in research information posted on our Special Libraries page. As you come upon information that you think should be included on this page, please e-mail us and let us know.


CTBL Provides Essential Service to Community

The Colorado Talking Book Library (CTBL) provides access to information for those with visual, physical, or learning disabilities. The latest Fast Facts, CTBL Provides Essential Service to Community, summarizes the results of the 2006 CTBL customer satisfaction survey. The results show just how much CTBL is valued by the community it serves.

ALA’s State of America’s Libraries Report, April 2007

Released this month, highlights from the report include:

* The number of visits to public libraries in the United States increased 61 percent between 1994 and 2004…there were nearly two billion visits to U.S. libraries in fiscal year 2004.

* Circulation at public libraries in the U.S. rose by 28 percent during the decade, partly driven by significant growth in circulation of children’s materials, which grew by 44 percent.

* Attendance in library programs for children was also up 42 percent for this same period.

The complete report and press release is available on the ALA website: or


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  • Public Library Statistics & Profiles
    Dive into annual statistics from the Colorado Public Library Annual Report using our interactive tool, results tailored to trustees, and state totals and averages.
  • School Library Impact Studies
    School libraries have a profound impact on student achievement. Explore studies about this topic by LRS and other researchers in our comprehensive guide.
  • Fast Fact Reports
    Looking for a quick rundown of library research? Check out our Fast Facts, which highlight research and statistics about various library topics.


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LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

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