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Kids involved in summer reading program were up to two times more likely to read every day

summer_reading

Image credit: East Lansing Public Library

Reading Is Fundamental (RIF), a children’s literacy nonprofit, recently released results of a summer reading survey it undertook with Macy’s. More than 1,000 parents of 5- to 11-year-olds were asked about their opinions about their child’s reading habits and summer reading. (We should also point out that this survey was “intended to gain mediagenic findings” for an RIF campaign in partnership with Macy’s.)

Parents reported their child reading more during the summer, spending an average 5.9 hours per week reading books, than during the school year, with an average 5.4 hours reading per week. In addition, the results indicated that children who participated in a reading program last summer were up to two times more likely to read every day. More than 8 in 10 (83%) parents felt it was extremely or very important that their child read during the summer. Parents who felt this way were twice as likely to say their child read a book at least 4 times a week last summer when compared to parents who felt reading was somewhat or not at all important.

At the same time, reading was not considered the most important activity for their child: Nearly half (49%) said playing outside was the most important activity they wanted their child to do this summer, while less than 1 in 5 (17%) said reading books was the most important activity.

Libraries were the major book provider for parents: A full 3 out of 4 parents said they borrowed books from the library for their child to read during the summer. More than 4 in 5 (86%) ever visited a library with their child, with 30% going to the library at least once a week last summer.

Read the full executive summary here to learn more about what children read during the summer, their preferences, and their parents’ opinions about summer reading.

Note: This post is part of our series, “The Weekly Number.” In this series, we highlight statistics that help tell the story of the 21st-century library.

U.S. publishers earned $27 billion in net revenue in 2013

BookStats 2013

Image credit: BookStats

The Association of American Publishers and the Book Industry Study Group recently released their 2013 update to BookStats, an annual survey covering trends and sales in book publishing. New for 2013: In the Trade category, adult non-fiction grew faster than juvenile (includes children’s and young adult), the category that had been the leader for the previous 2 years. (The Trade category includes “general consumer fiction and non-fiction.”)

Ebooks hit a record number in terms of volume sold, but revenue from ebooks was flat. Trade paperbacks were still the #1 format. E-audiobooks also had a strong year in 2013, hitting all-time peaks in sales and volume.

In sales, the book publishing industry’s revenue from online retail (of both ebooks and print) surpassed that of physical stores. While Trade revenue for 2012 was so strong—thanks to The Hunger Games and 50 Shades of Grey—that experts anticipated a large drop for 2013, the reality was that revenue did drop slightly in 2013 but overall numbers seem to mirror pacing set in previous years. Pulling together revenue data from all sectors—including K-12, Professional/Scholarly, Higher Education, and Trade—overall industry revenue was flat compared to 2012.

The full report is available for purchase, but you can also check out the press release and news brief to read more about how 2013 shaped up for U.S. book publishers.

Note: This post is part of our series, “The Weekly Number.” In this series, we highlight statistics that help tell the story of the 21st-century library.

Median academic librarian pay in 2013 was $53,000

LJ Salary Survey 2014

Image credit: Library Journal

Library Journal recently released results from its first Salary Survey for U.S. librarians and paralibrarians, across all library types. This new survey is a bit different than those we’ve talked about before in Weekly Number posts here and here and Fast Facts reports like this one: It isn’t tied to a particular library type or position category. Library Journal received responses from more than 3,200 librarians of all types—public to special to consortia—from all 50 states.

School librarians had the highest median salary of $58,000, and public librarians had the lowest at $47,446. Having the MLIS degree made a big difference in academic and public libraries: Staff with MLIS degrees earned almost 50% more than those without the degree. But for school librarians, the MLIS degree offered a median pay jump of just about $3,500 compared to non-degreed librarians. Two-thirds received a pay increase last year, with a median raise of 1.5%.

The survey also asked about job satisfaction, and the picture isn’t great: Less than a third (31%) said they were “very satisfied” with their jobs, and just 27% said they felt they had opportunities to advance in their role. Less than a quarter (23%) of those with part-time work reported being “very satisfied” with their jobs.

Part-time status is still a reality for many librarians, according to the survey: 16% of public librarians, and 6% of academic and school librarians said they worked part-time. Perhaps most telling is the fact that half of those part-timers had an MLIS degree.

You can peruse the tables from the report here and additional data here. And keep your eye out for our annual review of Library Jobline’s data to give you an idea of how the library job market and pay is shaping up based on last year’s job posts.

Note: This post is part of our series, “The Weekly Number.” In this series, we highlight statistics that help tell the story of the 21st-century library.

What kind of library users are in your community?

pew_quiz

Image credit: Pew Internet

Back in April, we blogged about a new Pew Internet Project study that clustered Americans into various groups based on their connection to libraries. The study’s results showed that the majority of Americans are at least somewhat engaged with their libraries–3 in 10 are highly engaged and 4 in 10 have a medium level of engagement.

Do you wonder what these results would be like in your community?  Today, Pew released a new community quiz tool that any library can use to see how engaged their users are. Click here to find out how to administer this quiz to your community. And, let us know what you learn about your users by connecting with us on Twitter!

U.S. public libraries had 1.52 BILLION visits in FY 2011

IMLS2011

Image credit: IMLS

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) just released its Fiscal Year 2011 Public Libraries in the United States Report, an annual report that aggregates data from all U.S. public libraries to tease out national trends and state-by-state comparisons. For the first time, this analysis included looking at the relationship between public library investments—revenue, staffing, and resources—and usage—visitation, circulation, program attendance, and computer use. Long story short: “When investment increases, use increases, and when investment decreases, use decreases, and these relationships persist over time.”

Want more specifics? When book and e-book volumes, programs, public access computers, and staffing went up, so did physical visits. When libraries offered more public access Internet computers, computer use went up. When programming and staffing went up, so did program attendance. And when collections and programs increased, so did circulation.

With digital and e-offerings, the picture is a little less clear. Physical visits decreased when investments in e-materials increased, which may be expected if patrons can use more library resources without stepping in the building. However, the report points out an issue near and dear to our hearts here at LRS: We need new survey questions to truly understand what’s happening with e-resources and the delivery and services associated with them.

Take a look at the full report, available here. And for a closer look at Colorado and other states, check out the state profile page. You can also access and manipulate Colorado’s data via our interactive tool.

Note: This post is part of our series, “The Weekly Number.” In this series, we highlight statistics that help tell the story of the 21st-century library.

Three-fourths of academic libraries use social media

acrl_2012

The 2012 Academic Library Trends and Statistics, an annual publication of the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL), examines services, collections, and expenditures of academic libraries at accredited colleges and universities across the U.S. and Canada. In 2012, 1,495 academic libraries participated in this survey.

We were particularly interested to note the social media use portion of the survey, which shows that about 3 in 4 (76%) academic libraries reported using social media. To break this down a bit further, let’s look at the numbers by type of degree granted by the library’s institution: 91% of doctorate, 83% master’s, 76% bachelor’s, and 60% associate’s degree granting institutions use social media of some kind. The top 3 outlets? Facebook, blogs, and Twitter. Wikis, RSS feeds, and IM were also quite popular at doctorate-granting institutions, although much less so at the other types of institutions.

Libraries were also asked about the purpose of using social media and, as you might expect, promotion of library services, events marketing, and community building were the top choices. Institutions also used social media to communicate with patrons, both about problems (like database downtime) and to gather feedback or suggestions more broadly.

The full 2012 Academic Library Trends and Statistics report is available for purchase in print or online via ACRL Metrics. You can learn more about social media and libraries—here in Colorado and across the country—by perusing our biennial study on public libraries and web technologies.

Note: This post is part of our series, “The Weekly Number.” In this series, we highlight statistics that help tell the story of the 21st-century library.

 

2012 Public Libraries Survey data now available

Blog_2012 PLS data

Image credit: Public Libraries Survey, IMLS

New national public library data is now available from the 2012 Public Libraries Survey from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). (This is the data set to which we contribute the Colorado Public Library Annual Report results each year.) Data files for 2012 should be available soon.

In the meantime, dig into the new data with the Compare Public Libraries and Search for Public Libraries tools. Try out the compare tool to see how your library stacks up to similar libraries across the country based on characteristics you choose. And the search tool is a handy way to pull together staff, budget, services, and collection information in one place.

Colorado has 7 times as many libraries as Starbucks stores

quotable_facts

Colorado’s public, school, and academic libraries offer their users a blend of technology services, learning opportunities, community activities, and information literacy initiatives. But what do these services and resources actually look like? We’ve sorted through a variety of data—from annual surveys to national reports—to provide a fresh update to our popular Quotable Facts report. We’ve highlighted some of our favorite statistics that we think help convey the importance of libraries of all kinds to the entire state of Colorado.

Did you know Colorado has 7 times as many libraries as Starbucks stores? And those libraries have more than 66 million visits each year, or more than 5 times as many as our state parks. For those technology buffs, 94% of the state’s public libraries offer technology training on tools like photo editing software and social media. With devices becoming more and more common, public libraries are increasingly offering wireless access (see our recent Fast Facts, Computers in Colorado’s Public Libraries) and saw more than 5 million wireless access uses in 2012, or more than 13,000 uses each day. And Colorado’s school librarians are making sure students are well-versed in 21st-century skills: Nearly 75% teach students how to use digital resources at least once a week.

Check out our new Quotable Facts report here. Please share often! And, if you would like printed copies, please contact us.

Note: This post is part of our series, “The Weekly Number.” In this series, we highlight statistics that help tell the story of the 21st-century library.

2013 Digital Inclusion Survey results coming soon

Blog_2013 Digital Inclusion Survey

Image credit: Information Policy & Access Center, University of Maryland

The first Digital Inclusion Survey—conducted by the ALA Office for Research & Statistics and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland—captured public library services related to digital literacy, economic and workforce development, education, health information, and internet access. Its overall goal is to highlight the role public libraries play in building “digitally inclusive communities.” (If this sounds familiar, the Digital Inclusion Survey picked up the reins from the Public Library Funding & Technology Access Survey, or PLFTAS.)

The 2013 Digital Inclusion Survey closed late last year, and researchers hope to release their national data report during ALA’s Annual Conference in a few weeks. In the meantime, we are having a blast playing around with the national interactive map. It combines demographic, economic, and health data from the American Community Survey and select Digital Inclusion Survey results to illustrate what libraries offer their communities and general attributes of those communities as well. Even better: iPAC is adding features to allow users to print pieces of this excellent tool. And if you’re looking for more help to tell the story of your 21st-century library, check out the issue briefs and map visualizations.

We’re looking forward to seeing the final results from this new survey!

New school library profiles show what is happening in Colorado school libraries

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Every year, LRS conducts a survey of Colorado school libraries. And, we’re continually thinking about how the results can be made more useful to respondents as well as to school library stakeholders. With this goal in mind, we are excited to debut our new school library profiles, which present information about individual school libraries based on the results of the 2013-14 survey responses. These are available in two formats:

  • Summary Profile: This profile presents information about the weekly use, collection, technology, and library hours of individual school libraries.
  • Expanded Profile: This profile contains this same information as the summary profile, and additionally presents data about the instructional and leadership activities of individual school librarians.

The profiles were designed to be a companion piece to our school library impact infographic.This piece summarizes two decades of school library research that demonstrates the impact of school libraries on student achievement.

Want more information about Colorado school libraries? You can access the complete 2013-14 school library survey results here. And, a summary of the results for all Colorado public schools is here.

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LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

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