News

New Field Initiated Study – Reports on Diversity and Inclusivity

Two reports have been added to our Field Initiated Studies page!  These reports come from Bonnie McCune and Heidi Baker with the Colorado Special Populations & Issues Committee.

The first, “The Future of Diverse Libraries,” is a survey from library staff members and indicates benchmarks, needs, and future steps. The second, based on personal interviews with leaders, “Key Informants: Opinions and Advice on Special Populations,” gives perspectives and general guidance.

To view these reports, click on the titles above or go to our Field Initiated Studies page at www.lrs.org/field.php.

-Jamie D.

Public Library Search & Compare Tools Updated with 2008 Data

The IMLS search and compare tools have been updated with the 2008 national public library data. 

Search tool: http://harvester.census.gov/imls/search/index.asp
Compare tool: http://harvester.census.gov/imls/compare/index.asp

Preliminary Data from the 2009 Public Library Annual Report Now Available!

Preliminary data from the 2009 Public Library Annual Report is now available.  Click here to access the newest public library data!

Thanks to all of the public libraries that worked so hard on this years Public Library Annual Report!

-Jamie D.

State of America’s Libraries, 2010

ALA just released their State of America’s Libraries, 2010 report.

“The report shows the value of libraries in helping Americans combat the recession. It includes data from a January 2010 Harris Interactive poll that provides compelling evidence that a decade-long trend of increasing library use is continuing—and even accelerating during economic hard times. This national survey indicates that some 219 million Americans feel the public library improves the quality of life in their community. More than 223 million Americans feel that because it provides free access to materials and resources, the public library plays an important role in giving everyone a chance to succeed.”

For more: http://www.ala.org/ala/newspresscenter/mediapresscenter/americaslibraries/index.cfm.

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

Fast Facts: More Job Seekers, Fewer Jobs

A new Fast Facts is up!  More Job Seekers, Fewer Jobs: Findings from Library Jobline, Year Three” reports trends found in LibraryJobline.org postings from 2007-2009.  While the number of job postings drastically decreased as the economy struggled, the number of job seekers increased, making the field more competitive.  Click on the title above or visit the Fast Facts page to read more!

– Jamie H.

Study Shows How Americans Benefit from Internet Access at Libraries

Released at PLA this week, the study Opportunity for All: How the American Public Benefits from Internet Access at U.S. Libraries shows what most librarians already knew—patrons are using the library for more than checking out paper books.  The study is already generating buzz outside of the library profession and is being picked-up by news outlets around the country. (I saw it this morning on the local news.)

From IMLS:
Nearly one-third of Americans age 14 or older – roughly 77 million people – used a public library computer or wireless network to access the Internet in the past year, according to a national report released today. In 2009, as the nation struggled through a recession, people relied on library technology to find work, apply for college, secure government benefits, learn about critical medical treatments, and connect with their communities.

The report, Opportunity for All: How the American Public Benefits from Internet Access at U.S. Libraries, is based on the first, large-scale study of who uses public computers and Internet access in public libraries, the ways library patrons use this free technology service, why they use it, and how it affects their lives. It was conducted by the University of Washington Information School and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Full report : http://tascha.washington.edu/usimpact.

For broadcast-quality footage, high-resolution still photography, and information about the foundation’s work, please visit: www.gatesfoundation.org/press-room/Pages/news-market.aspx.

 ~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

2009 LSA Populations Posted

The 2009 Library Service Area Populations are posted on the Colorado Statistics/Profiles  page (scroll down to open the 2009 LSA Populations Spreadsheet). This is the latest legal service area population data. These LSA population figures will be used for each public library on the 2009 Colorado Public Library Annual Report.

New Fast Facts and New Field Initiated Study Posted

We’ve just posted a new Fast Facts: Computer Access and Traditional Library Services. This Fast Facts examines what happens to public library visits, circulation, reference, and program attendance as the number of public access computers rises. Do the “traditional services” decrease as libraries provide more computer access, or do those services increase as well? Go to the Fast Facts page or click on the title above to read more!

A new Field Initiated Study has also been posted: Library Sponsored Events and Programming Promotion Ideas. This came from a question posted on the Libnet listserv by Donna Arment, of the Durango Public Library, regarding promoting library sponsored programs. To read the responses received, click on the title above or go to our Field Initiated Studies page.

-Jamie

Results from the 60-Second Survey: The Future of the Book

Last month we asked what you thought of the future of the book in our latest 60-second survey, aptly titled, The Future of the Book. More than 1,300 people took our survey and this is what they said…

When asked, “Do you think paper books will eventually disappear,” almost 2 out of 3 respondents (63%) said paper books would never disappear. 15 percent said books would disappear within the next 50 years, 11 percent said within 51-100 years, and 11 percent said books would disappear in more than 100 years.
(Click on a chart for a larger, more detailed image.)

When asked, “What do you predict libraries will circulate in 10 years,” 43 percent of our respondents predict an equal amount of physical and electronic materials. On the other hand, only a slightly lower percentage of respondents – 39% – predict that libraries will circulate more electronic materials than physical.

Our survey also asked in what format (audio, electronic, or paper) respondents currently read fiction, non-fiction, and textbooks, as well as how they predict how they will read those materials 10 years from now. Those that use audio did not expect much change in 10 years (less than 1% change in each category). The largest expected transformation among respondents was for textbooks. 10 percent currently read them in an electronic format, but 59% expect to be reading them electronically in 10 years.

Survey respondents also predicted a change in how they will read fiction and non-fiction. Currently, 86 percent of our respondents read non-fiction in a paper format, but only 59 percent expect they will still be reading non-fiction that way in 10 years.

As for fiction, 88 percent of our respondents read fiction from paper books, but only 70% predict they will still read fiction that way in 10 years.

Additionally, almost 3 out of 4 of our respondents (71%) left comments about the future of the book. Stay tuned for more details about the results and the comments provided in an upcoming Fast Facts.

Let us know what you think about these results and the future of the book by leaving a comment below.

-Jamie

ALA Releases New Report – The Condition of Libraries: 1999-2009

From ALA:
CHICAGO – At every turn, news reports and research indicate fairly dramatic changes in U.S. library funding, services and staffing – most occurring in the last 18 months. According to a new report prepared by the American Library Association (ALA), libraries of all types are feeling the pinch of the economic downturn while managing sky-high use.

Compiled from a broad range of available sources, The Condition of Libraries: 1999-2009 presents U.S. economic trends (2009), and summarizes trends in public, school and academic libraries across several library measures, including expenditures, staffing and services. The report also highlights trends in services provided to libraries by library cooperatives and consortia.
[More at: http://www.ala.org/ala/newspresscenter/news/pressreleases2010/january2010/outlook_ors.cfm]

Report: http://www.ala.org/ala/research/initiatives/Condition_of_Libraries_1999.20.pdf
Reports by library type: http://www.ala.org/ala/research/index.cfm

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LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

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