News

Special Libraries Page

Librarians who work in special libraries may be interested in research information posted on our Special Libraries page. As you come upon information that you think should be included on this page, please e-mail us and let us know.

Daphne
Eastburn_D@cde.state.co.us

Social Networking Study Released by NSBA

The study, ” Creating & Connecting: Research and Guidelines on Online Social – and Educational – Networking” looks at the usage of social networking by 9 to 17-year olds. Three groups were surveyed for the study: tweens and teens (9 to 17-year olds), parents, and school district leaders.

From the report…
* 59% of online students say they talk about education related topics
* 50% of online students say they talk specifically about schoolwork
* Less than 1% of all students say they’ve actually met someone in person from an online encounter without their parents’ permission
* 84% of school districts have rules against online chatting and 81% against instant messaging in school

Sections of the report include The Positives, The Gaps, Expectations & Interests, and Striking a Balance-Guidance & Recommendations for School Board Members. The study was conducted by Grunwald Associates and underwritten by News Corporation, Microsoft and Verizon.

The report: http://www.nsba.org/site/docs/41400/41340.pdf
NSBA: http://www.nsba.org/site/index.asp

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

Historical Circ Data Creates Some Buzz

Colorado public libraries’ historical circulation data is included in a recent study that is making the rounds on blogs, listservs, and email lists. Written by economist Douglas A. Galbi, “ Book Circulation Per U.S. Public Library User Since 1856,” is an analysis of library circulation trends from various sources going back over 150 years. Included in the analysis is Colorado library circulation data from 1920 through 2000, which appears in an LRS Fast Fact from 2003, “ Colorado Public Libraries Historical Data” written by Becky Russell.

Complete online circulation report from Galbi: http://www.galbithink.org/libraries/circulation.htm
More library data analysis from Galbi: http://www.galbithink.org/libraries/analysis.htm
Homepage for Douglas Galbi: http://galbithink.org/
LRS Fast Facts, “Colorado Public Libraries Historical Data”: http://www.lrs.org/documents/fastfacts/198_historical_pl_data.pdf

Thanks to Denise Davis at the ALA Office for Research & Statistics and Larry T. Nix, Library History Buff, for emailing this link to me.

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

2006 Metro Report Now Available

The 2006 Metro Report is now available. The Metro Report consists of tables and charts of statistics from selected public libraries in metropolitan areas with operating expenditures greater than $1 million.

Daphne
Eastburn_D@cde.state.co.us

Stats Show Libraries Increasingly Popular

Public library directors report increased circulation, program attendance, and computer use, says a recent article in the Boston Globe. “Area directors say they have also seen growth in ways not measured by circulation, like use of public computers and attendance at library programs. “We’re busier than ever,” said Beth Mazin, assistant director of Andover’s Memorial Hall Library. “Our library is jammed with people.”

For more on this story go the Boston Globe online at:

http://www.boston.com/news/globe/?p1=Header_BostonGlobe

Or the article at:
Good circulation…Internet helps libraries, despite predictions it would spell the end

http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2007/07/29/good_circulation/

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

Instant Messaging in Small Academic Libraries

Librarians working in academic libraries may be interested in the latest Field Initiated Study summarizing a Libnet inquiry posted by Gayle Gunderson, Director of the Colorado Christian University Library, entitled Instant Messaging in Small Academic Libraries.

For more information, you may click on the link above or see our Field Initiated Studies section for more information.

~ Daphne
Eastburn_D@cde.state.co.us

2006 Public Library Statistics — Available

The 2006 Public Library Statistics are now finalized and available on our site. Go to our Public Stats Page to find spreadsheets, PDFs, and interactive statistics for 2006.

Zeth
-lietzau_z@cde.state.co.us

Who Knew?…Harry Potter Fun Facts

LRS would like to pay homage to Harry Potter fans this month by sharing some fun facts about the books and movies that have given many of us so much joy. So, as some of you wait for the minutes to pass until you can pick-up the FINAL book in the series this Saturday, here are some facts to tide you over…

Harry Potter as Book:

• The Harry Potter series has sold 325 million copies worldwide with 121.5 million in-print in the U.S. alone.

• The sixth book in the series, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, sold a record-breaking 6.9 million copies in the first 24 hours. The same book also broke records by selling more than 11 million copies in the first nine weeks.

• The U.S. version of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows is being printed at the R.R. Donnelley publishing plant located in the rural town of Crawfordsville, Indiana. The town of Crawfordsville does not have a single bookstore.

• Of the 12 million first-print copies of the 784-page Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows book, 65% will be printed on paper accredited by the Forest Stewardship Council. This is the largest purchase of FSC certified paper to be used in the printing of a single book title.

Harry Potter as Library Book:

• The Harry Potter Series ranks #7 on the American Library Association’s (ALA) list of 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books 1990-2000.

• Harry Potter author J. K. Rowling ranks #4 on ALA’s list of Top Ten Challenged Authors 1990-2004.

• As of July 17, 2007, Denver Public Library patrons have placed 1,468 holds on Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. This includes holds placed on the print book, audio book, and large print book.

Harry Potter as Stamp:

• Britain’s Royal Mail has issued a series of seven stamps depicting the covers of Harry Potter books.

• Approximately 340,000 people have pre-ordered the Harry Potter stamps which break the 300,000 record set by the Beatles stamps released in January 2007.

Harry Potter as Movie:

• The recently released movie version of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix earned $44.2 million in the first 24 hours of its release, making it the biggest single-day gross in box office history.

• The same film made $77.1 million during its opening weekend which brings its U.S. total to $140 million after five days. The worldwide total is at $352 million so far…

Sources (in order of being quoted):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Potter_(statistics)

http://www.scholastic.com/aboutscholastic/divisions/childrensbook.htm

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Harry_Potters_Not_Enough/articleshow/2202404.cms

http://abcnews.go.com/WN/Story?id=3382195&page=1

http://www.scholastic.com/harrypotter/press032007.htm

http://www.ala.org/ala/oif/bannedbooksweek/bbwlinks/100mostfrequently.htm

http://www.ala.org/ala/oif/bannedbooksweek/bbwlinks/authors19902004.htm

http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/07/17/europe/EU-GEN-Britain-Potter-stamps.php

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Potter_and_the_Order_of_the_Phoenix_%28film%29

Predictions for Library Jobs in 2030

A recent article in Education Week shares various views on the growth of jobs in libraries and education. One expert is quoted, “from 2004 to 2014, the employment sector composed of library, training, and teaching jobs is anticipated to add nearly 2 million jobs—a jump of 20 percent.” Another expert predicts these jobs will decline 74% by 2030. The article is aptly titled, “Job Skills of the Future in Researchers’ Crystal Ball.” Read more at http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2007/06/20/42skills.h26.html.

~Nicolle
steffen_n@cde.state.co.us

LRS @ ALA 2007

LRS staff recently returned from the ALA Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. We enjoyed soaking in the conference, and wanted to share some of our experiences with you.

Jennifer’s Top 5 Tips for First-Time ALA Conference Attendees

5. Stay in a hotel with colleagues. After a day of socializing with strangers it’s nice to share thoughts and ideas about the conference with a buddy.

4. Dress in layers. Walking from each location can cause you to heat up fast, but most of the conference spaces are very cool.

3. Choose several sessions for each time slot. Having alternatives allows you to change plans at the last minute due issues such as location or overcrowding.

2. Don’t be afraid to exit or enter sessions during presentations. Due to the scope and variety of the conference, it is impossible to see every thing in its entirety. Also, presentations may turn out to be not what you expected.

1. Wear comfortable shoes! Although it is a professional conference, comfy shoes are acceptable. Plan for lots of walking and standing on concrete.

Nicolle shares:

Over and over again I heard how one thing or another compared to Library Thing. Library Thing: http://www.librarything.com/

Take a look at the tag cloud at University of Pennsylvania’s PENNTAGS. “PennTags is a social bookmarking tool for locating, organizing, and sharing your favorite online resources.” PennTags: http://tags.library.upenn.edu/

Keith shared with AASL (http://www.ala.org/ala/aasl/aaslindex.cfm) members and other conference attendees preliminary findings from the first annual school library survey, School Libraries Count (http://www.aaslsurvey.org/). Look for more at the AASL conference in Reno this fall.

Also, look for an update from the ALA Committee on Research & Statistics: http://www.ala.org/ala/ors/orscommittees/corsagendasminutes/corsagendasandminutes.htm

I (Zeth) spent most of my conference time immersed in sessions revolving around the topic du jour in the world of libraries – Library 2.0. I heard a lot about blogs, wikis, podcasts, social networking and, or course, Second Life. The thing that struck me most, though, was the fact that there is a lot going on by way of open source software in libraries. Examples:

Evergreen (http://www.open-ils.org/), and open source ILS first implemented by the Georgia Library PINES consortium, has some pretty great functionality.

Ann Arbor District Library (http://www.aadl.org/) has transformed their website using Drupal (http://drupal.org/), an open-source content management system.

The University of Rochester is working on an extensible catalog (http://extensiblecatalog.info/), to interact with existing catalogs to provide better services.

All of these could be great opportunities to customize your ILS/website, especially if you have staff that can program.

If you went to ALA and would like to share your experience, let us know in the comments. And, for more conference highlights be sure check out ALA Conference Highlights: http://link.ixs1.net/s/ve?eli=3130100&si=y98459802&cfc=3html.

Daphne’s Highlights:

I attended several sessions covering a wide variety of topics from Global Librarianship to Social Networking ~ Harnessing the Hive and a session with researchers presenting their library research.

I was so happy to see one of my favorite mystery writers, Patricia Cornwell. During her session, she spent a lot of time answering questions from the audience and also had a few questions of her own for librarians. She concluded with an inspirational message for us all, “Touch one person, do one good thing, and collectively we will change the planet”.

Beth Strickland’s Two Cents:

If the rest of you are anything like me, you will find that after attending your first ALA conference you’ll have an unexplained craving to plan on attending every ALA annual conference until you retire (and even then, that probably won’t keep you away).

Although the majority of sessions I attended were about academic libraries and diversity issues, I was able to attend a session about designing video games for college students which teach information literacy skills. If this is a topic you are interested in, I suggest finding related articles on the ASIS&T (The Information Society for the Information Age) website located at: http://www.asis.org/ or, go to the blog address listed below which provides a forum for librarians interested in using video games to teach, a space to discuss a variety of topics: http://bibliogaming.blogspot.com/

Lastly, if you are interested in LIS research and want to get a glimpse of new research coming down the pipeline I suggest attending the session about the research being done by LIS graduate students from around the country. Some amazing work is coming from some PhD students at the University of Maryland: http://www.clis.umd.edu/research/students/ Check it out if you want idea of where the future of LIS research is going.

Oh, and quick little P.S. here…but if you are approached by vendors trying to sell you something you’re not interested in, just tell them you are an LIS student. This is a sure fire way to make sure they leave you alone.

See you next year!

Carla’s observations:

I was impressed and overwhelmed by the variety of topics covered at ALA. I had a hard time choosing between some of the fun-sounding new technologies sessions and those discussing the more traditional topics. It was interesting to select from session topics that dealt with rural libraries, or how library resources are used to help in the preparation of theatrical productions of Shakespeare’s plays, and even one on The European Union Today which discussed the changing European identity and its implications on libraries and scholarship. It was a fabulous experience and I came away from it with lots of new information for me to think about and new ways for me to get involved.

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LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

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