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We’re hiring!

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You are fascinated by statistics. You are deeply passionate about libraries. You understand the importance of data-driven decision making, but most importantly, your driving motivation is to make data and evaluation accessible and useful to a wide variety of audiences, from frontline librarians to policymakers and stakeholders.

So, when your phone buzzed this morning to let you know that a new job was posted to LibraryJobline.org, your heart skipped a beat when you saw five glorious words: Research…Analyst… Library…Research…Service.

The Research Analyst will lead a variety of research and evaluation efforts for and about libraries in Colorado and beyond – designing studies, analyzing the results, and presenting the findings in a variety of formats, ranging from scholarly journal articles to press releases. This person will also share her/his passion for data with the library community by providing training and professional development opportunities about evaluation in venues ranging from regional workshops to webinars to the national Research Institute for Public Libraries. The ideal candidate for this position…

  • Believes that evaluation can transform library practice
  • Has a strong background in statistical analysis, knowing which statistical methods are appropriate and how to correctly conduct data analysis using those methods
  • Has superior writing skills and can make research findings understandable to a broad spectrum of readers
  • Is an experienced trainer who can make data and evaluation topics accessible and interesting to lay audiences
  • BONUS: Has an eye for design and experience creating infographics

For more information and to apply, please see https://www.libraryjobline.org/job/5378/Research-Analyst . The application deadline is April 27, 2016.

Come work with us!

Come work with us!

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Are you interested in joining the LRS team? We’re hiring for two positions:

Position #1: Research Analyst

Do you hold a firm belief that statistics are fascinating? Do you often find yourself diving deep into data analysis to find the meaning behind the numbers? Do you enjoy making complex research results accessible to a wide variety of audiences? If so, we have the job for you! The Colorado State Library’s Library Research Service (LRS) has an opening for the position of Research Analyst.

The Research Analyst will lead a variety of research and evaluation efforts for and about libraries in Colorado and beyond – designing studies, analyzing the results, and presenting the findings in a variety of formats, ranging from scholarly journal articles to press releases. This person will also share her/his passion for data with the library community by providing training and professional development opportunities about evaluation in venues ranging from regional workshops to webinars to the national Research Institute for Public Libraries. The ideal candidate for this position…

  • Believes that evaluation can transform library practice
  • Has a strong background in statistical analysis, knowing which statistical methods are appropriate and how to correctly conduct data analysis using those methods
  • Has superior writing skills and can make research findings understandable to a broad spectrum of readers
  • Is an experienced trainer who can make data and evaluation topics accessible and interesting to lay audiences
  • BONUS:  Has an eye for design and experience creating infographics

For more information and to apply, see https://www.libraryjobline.org/job/5243/Research-Analyst?ref=page1. The application deadline is March 4, 2016.

Position #2: Research Assistant

Do you have a strong opinion about the Oxford comma and singular “they”? Do you find yourself looking for the “real story” behind the numbers reported in the media? Are you intrigued by the popularity of infographics? Do you like a combination of collaborative and independent work? If so, we’ve got the job for you! The Colorado State Library’s Library Research Service (LRS) has an opening for the position of Research Assistant.

This person will collaborate with LRS colleagues to write about research findings for the library community, develop content for LRS.org, and support evaluation projects. The ideal person for this opening is passionate about libraries, appreciates data and numbers, and is looking for a position that is part job, part discovery, and part learning. S/he is the type of person who knows…

  • how to write well, especially for non-experts and the web
  • why accurate data are so important
  • how to proofread and edit technical documents
  • how to provide excellent customer service
  • how to be part of a team and work independently
  • when to obsess about the small stuff and when to focus on the big picture
  • BONUS: experience or interest in data visualization

For more information and to apply, see https://www.libraryjobline.org/job/5242/Research-Assistant?ref=page1. The application deadline is March 4, 2016.

Half of public library respondents report internet connectivity speeds of more than 10 Mbps

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Image credit: Digital Inclusion Survey

We’ve shared the Digital Inclusion Survey with you before, and now new research results dive into data specifically about broadband speeds in public libraries. More than 2,200 public libraries from 49 states reported upload and download speeds at their libraries for wired and Wi-Fi connections. City libraries reported median download speeds of 30 Mbps (wired) and 13 Mbps (Wi-Fi), while rural libraries reported medians of 9 Mbps (wired) and 6 Mbps (Wi-Fi).

According to the most recent data, about half (49.8%) of all libraries reported download speeds of more than 10 Mbps, up from just 18% that had achieved those speeds in 2009. The percentage of libraries with the slowest public Internet speeds of 1.5 Mbps or less dropped to 1 in 10 in 2013 from 42.2% in 2009. While the strides being made are exciting, the reality is that just 2% of public libraries meet national benchmarks set by the Federal Communications Commission for minimum speeds serving smaller communities (100 Mbps) and more than 50,000 people (1 Gbps).

Technical issues also abound, as might be expected when it comes to Internet connectivity speeds. Captured speeds—both at individual user’s devices and for uploads—lag behind subscribed network speeds. Peak use times meant reduced speeds, particularly for city libraries which saw direct download speeds drop 69% during heavy usage when compared to light usage periods.

Read the full report, including additional breakdowns by locale and connection type, here. This broadband discussion is even more timely considering Pew’s recent analysis of Census data about broadband access among households with children and the “homework gap” and what this information might mean for libraries. We’ll bring you more on that research soon.

 Note: This post is part of our series, “The Weekly Number.” In this series, we highlight statistics that help tell the story of the 21st-century library.

LIS starting salaries are up almost 3% for new graduates according to Library Journal survey

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Image credit: Library Journal

As part of our periodic look at Library Journal’s Placements &Salaries Survey, we found good news rolling out overall for 2013 graduates. The 2014 survey looked at just over 2,000 of last year’s LIS graduates in order to assess changes in job description, salary, and geographic distribution across the profession. The general trend appears to be for positive growth – average starting salaries are up 2.6% across the board compared to 2013, and average starting salaries have risen above $45,000. The graduates also reported a slightly shorter job search, at an average of 4.2 months.

One component driving this improvement was an expansion of responsibilities across the digital sector of the field. Librarians are increasingly taking on responsibilities such as managing social media, digital asset/content, and digital projects. Out of all of the positions reported, those whose applicants garnered the highest starting salaries were data analytics, emerging technologies, knowledge management, and user experience/user interface design, all positions that offered an average starting salary over $55,000. Graduates entering into user experience/ user interface design positions started with salaries a staggering 53% higher than the average LIS graduate, at $70,026.

But here is the catch. Many of these digital positions still only account for a small portion of the total positions being filled by new graduates. For example, digital content management jobs were only a fraction (3%) of the total placements, and while they had a significant concentration in Western states and salaries were slightly higher than average, the overall starting salary for this position actually decreased somewhat from 2013 (by 5%). So what does all of this mean? Positions with substantial digital components are becoming more common, especially in private industry, archives, and public libraries, but this growth is not necessarily consistent across library type and geographical area. In the coming years, we will certainly have to keep an eye on this trend towards the digital LIS professional, as well as how positions and wages compare to those across the field.

Want to see how your library position or region is faring? You can access the full data from the survey here.

Note: This post is part of our series, “The Weekly Number.” In this series, we highlight statistics that help tell the story of the 21st-century library.

New Public Library Data Tools

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We are excited to present a brand new set of tools for interacting with data from our Public Library Annual Survey. The new tools are packed with features, including:

  • Quickly locate data for a single year and statistic group
  • Build custom data sets by specifying years, statistics, libraries, etc.
  • Visualize data using graphs and maps
  • Export data in .csv format

Did you know that Library Research Service now has over 25 years’ worth of public library data available? Our new tools make finding and analyzing this data simple!

Follow me to the new public library interactive tools

New Glee! Article in School Library Journal

Check out Julie and Chelsea’s piece about representing real school librarians on the hit TV show Glee!:

Hey, ‘Glee.’ Get Real: It’s time for the TV series to make room for a genuine librarian

Special thanks to Keith Curry Lance, who designed the poll that inspired this article.

~Julie

New LRS Research Fellow Positions Open for Current DU MLIS Students

Are you interested in learning more about all types of libraries in Colorado?

Do you like to write?

Do you want the opportunity to work with a variety of LIS professionals?

If you’re a current DU MLIS student and you answered “yes” to any or all of the above, we encourage you to apply for the LRS-DU Research Fellowship. Please see the description below for more information about the available positions (yes, there is more than one) and the application procedure.

(In case you are experiencing déjà vu… Yes, we have reopened the research fellowship search. We received feedback that the original deadline in December was ill-timed.)

Library Research Service (LRS) is excited to announce the availability of two Research Fellowship positions, available February 2012.  For over 15 years LRS has collaborated with the University of Denver Library and Information Science program to provide Fellowships to current DU LIS students.   LRS Fellowships are an excellent way to gain valuable professional experience and skills within a variety of research-related activities.  They also provide opportunities to publish and present findings at the local and national level.  LRS Fellows touch, to varying degrees, almost everything that the LRS produces, from blog posts and Fast Facts on LRS.org to research reports and presentations.

 The Positions

The first position is a one to two-year appointment (based on graduation date) located at the Colorado State Library in downtown Denver.  The person in this position will participate in the full breadth of activities and services that LRS performs, such as data collection and analysis, report writing, contributing to LRS.org and LibraryJobline.org, and enhancing LRS’s social networking presence. The position works 20 hours per week and offers flexible scheduling to fit with your graduate coursework and responsibilities. LRS Research fellows are employed on part-time, temporary, at-will bases, and earn $17.50 per hour.

The second position is an appointment as a contractor working with LRS and State Library staff on the State Library’s Public Computer Centers (PCC) in Colorado Libraries Project (http://coloradovirtuallibrary.org/btop/), a $3.3 million grant project that will create and equip computer centers in public libraries throughout the state. We anticipate approximately 400 contract hours, to be completed between February 2012 and June 2012. For the PCC project LRS’s responsibilities are data collection and analysis that contributes to project evaluation.

The Requirements

In addition to being currently enrolled in the University of Denver MLIS program, applicants must demonstrate solid writing skills, an interest in research and data collection, and an appreciation for the roles they play in supporting and advancing library services.  The ideal applicants for this position will be individuals with good project management skills who are equally at ease working independently and with a team.  They will have basic knowledge of technology and software solutions (word processing, spreadsheets, etc.).  Most importantly, they will be eager to learn and explore.

About LRS

LRS is a unit of the Colorado State Library, a division of the Colorado Department of Education.  Our mission is to provide library professionals, educators, public officials, and the media with research and statistics about libraries. We do this by conducting regular surveys of public, school, and academic libraries, and by making data available on LRS.org.  LRS also maintains LibraryJobline.org, the State’s online library job board.  For a fuller description of what we do, visit http://www.LRS.org.

The Application Process

Think LRS might be a good fit for you?  Applicants must complete and submit the following application materials by January 25, 2012:

Please submit your resume, cover letter, and writing sample to Luisa Davila at Davila_L (at) cde.state.co.us.  Applicants will be emailed confirmation of their submission. Interviews will be conducted Friday, February 10,2012.

New Fast Facts: CTBL Continues to Earn High Marks

In 2010, LRS administered the fourth patron satisfaction and outcome survey for The Colorado Talking Book Library (CTBL). Our results indicated that the vast majority of patrons are highly satisfied with CTBL service. Nearly all respondents gave high ratings for their overall satisfaction with CTBL and individual service components. Beyond the high ratings, the comments left by survey respondents give testimony to how important CTBL is to its patrons. Comments show that through CTBL, patrons are able to read for pleasure, stay informed, and feel connected.

To learn more about our findings, click here to access the Fast Facts.

We’re on Twitter!

Did you know that LRS is now on Twitter? We use our account to highlight new research and statistics from the field, share resources for libraries to use for advocacy and decision-making purposes, get feedback about LIS trends and hot topics, and more!  This is also a great way to communicate with us if you have a quick question or comment. Come join the conversation–you can find us at @LRS_CO.

~Linda

2011 State of America’s Libraries — ALA Releases Annual Report

From ALA:

“Library trends of the past year are detailed in the State of America’s Libraries, 2011, released during National Library Week, April 10-16, 2011, by the American Library Association.

Even as budget-cutters take aim at libraries and their services, more than two-thirds of the 1,000-plus adults contacted in a survey in January said that the library’s assistance in starting a business or finding a job was important to them, according to the poll, conducted for the American Library Association (ALA) by Harris Interactive.

Sixty-five percent of those polled said they had visited the library in the past year; women are significantly more likely than men (72 percent vs. 58 percent) to fall into this category, especially working women, working mothers and women aged 18-54. Overall, 58 percent of those surveyed said they had a library card, and the largest group was, again, women, especially working women and working mothers. College graduates and those with a household income of more than $100,000 were also well represented among card holders, according to the survey.”

Report: http://ala.org/ala/newspresscenter/mediapresscenter/americaslibraries2011/index.cfm

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POPULAR RESOURCES

  • Public Library Statistics & Profiles
    Dive into annual statistics from the Colorado Public Library Annual Report using our interactive tool, results tailored to trustees, and state totals and averages.
  • School Library Impact Studies
    School libraries have a profound impact on student achievement. Explore studies about this topic by LRS and other researchers in our comprehensive guide.
  • Fast Fact Reports
    Looking for a quick rundown of library research? Check out our Fast Facts, which highlight research and statistics about various library topics.

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ABOUT

LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

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