Archive for the Public Category

CALCON11: It’s time to think outside the box!

Everyone’s heard of thinking outside the box, right? You know-the ability to break out of unconventional thinking and apply innovative ideas to problem solving. Well, now we invite you to explore ways of thinking outside the survey and using innovative methods to learn about the people who use your library.

Please join us at CALCON11 for:

Beyond the Survey: Innovative Techniques for Learning About Your Patrons

Friday, October 14, 2011, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, Snowberry

We’ll present 10 creative-and often fun-ways to engage your patrons, staff, and community and get the information you need. Bring your ideas, questions, and enthusiasm. We’d like to share our ideas and hear yours.

It’s time to think outside the survey!

~Linda, Lisa, & Nicolle

60% is the magic number!

A magic percentage for public libraries, really. “How is it magic,” you ask. It is the response rate each state must reach in order to have state-level reports from the National Survey of Public Library Funding and Technology Access (PLFTAS). Reports like the State Briefs found here: http://plinternetsurvey.org/advocacy/state-details?id=CO.

Want to be part of the magic?
Take the survey here: http://plftas.pnmi.com/   
Look up you library’s survey id here: http://plftas.pnmi.com/lookup.cfm?CO   
More information here: http://www.plinternetsurvey.org/

This survey provides important information about computer and Internet resources and infrastructure, as well as funding, technology training, and other uses of public libraries, such as providing public access technology centers in their communities. The data from this study has been used in many influential ways, including:

     * U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding the Children’s Internet Protection Act (http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/02-361.ZO.html)

     * U.S. Statistical Abstracts (http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2011/tables/11s1153.pdf)

     *  MSNBC’s “Libraries Lend a Hand in Tough Times” (http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/26184891/vp/31237988#31237988)

     *  NPR’s “Digital Challenges for U.S. Public Libraries” (http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2010/06/21/127990542/digital-challenges-for-u-s-public-libraries)

     * U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services report “Catalyst for Change: LSTA Grants to States Program Activities and the Transformation of Library Services to the Public” (http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2010/06/21/127990542/digital-challenges-for-u-s-public-libraries)

 Have questions, need more information? Please call 301-405-9445 or e-mail ipac.umd@gmail.com for survey support. Survey administrators monitor the support e-mail account from 9 AM – 5 PM (ET), Monday through Friday. For other information and updates, you call follow the survey/report on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/iPAC_UMD.

Thanks.
Nicolle

New article in Computers in Libraries–U.S. Public Libraries and Web Technologies

We have an article in the September 2011 issue of Computer in Libraries, “U.S. Public Libraries and Web Technologies: What’s Happening Now?”. It highlights the findings from a study about public libraries’ use of Web 2.0 technologies that we released last spring (available as a Closer Look report). Key findings from the study included that:

  • 80% of U.S. public libraries serving LSA populations of 500,000+ had a Facebook account in 2010. More than half (58%) of libraries serving 100,000-499,999 people were on Facebook, as were 56% of libraries serving 25,000-99,999 people.
  • In 2010, 66% of public libraries serving LSA populations of 500,000+ had a Twitter account.
  • Even when controlling for staff and collection expenditures, being an “early adopter” library (i.e., libraries in the top 20% of their population group in terms of Web 2.0 adoption) was a significant predictor of visits, circulation, and program attendance.

Colorado-specific findings from this study are available in a Fast  Facts.

2009 Public Library Data Files Released

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) announced the release of the 2009 Public Libraries Survey (PLS) data. It is available on the IMLS web site at: http://harvester.census.gov/imls/data/pls/index.asp. All 50 states and the District of Columbia participate in the Public Libraries Survey every year and the collection includes data on visitation, circulation, the availability and use of library computing resources, staffing, library collections and services, and fiscal information such as operating revenue and expenditures.

Our new American Libraries feature article– “Who’s the Boss”–is now available

Last November, we asked you in a 60-second survey to share your opinions about privatization and public libraries. We just published the results of this study as a feature article in American Libraries: “Who’s the Boss? Does Private Management Have a Place in Public Libraries?”. Access the article here. The study’s results were also summarized in an earlier blog post.

Thanks again to everyone who responded to our survey! Your participation and thought-provoking comments provided us with an excellent foundation from which to work as we wrote the article. We’re excited to continue sharing your opinions about hot topics in LIS in future studies.

~Linda

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Who is in the Queue: Public Access Computer Users

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) just published the research brief:  “Who’s in the Queue? A Demographic Analysis of Public Access Computer Users and Uses in U.S. Public Libraries” by Carlos A. Manjarrez and Kyle Schoembs.

 Highlights from the report include:

• The demographic analysis in this brief dispels some myths about the beneficiaries of public access computer services in U.S. public libraries. Public access computer users largely resemble the general public in terms of age, education, and even in the overall level of home computer and Internet access.

 • The fact that many different people report that they are able to fulfill a wide variety of information needs is a clear indication that public libraries are providing much more than basic technology access

• Substantive uses of public access computers mirror the needs people have at different stages of the life course. Young people identify education activities as their main use, people between the ages of 25 and 54 identifying employment activities as their top use, and people 55 and older reporting health and wellness research as the main public access computer use.

Research brief link: http://www.imls.gov/pdf/Brief2011_04.pdf

Librarian Job Satisfaction Survey

Library Journal’s 2011 Job Satisfaction Survey–Rocked by Recession, Buoyed by Service:  “Budget cuts from coast to coast have turned up the heat, but librarians still love their jobs. Realistically, however, money shortages have reduced advancement opportunities and many feel they’ll have to leave libraries before retiring.”

Read the article at: http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/newslettersnewsletterbucketljxpress/890617-441/lj_2011_job_satisfaction_survey.html.csp

Read about the results from the LRS survey “What is the Value of an MLIS to You?” at: http://www.lrs.org/news/2011/06/14/results-from-the-60-second-survey-what-is-the-value-of-an-mlis-to-you/

2010-2011 Public Library Funding & Technology Access Report Now Available

ALA officially released the 2010-2011 Public Library Funding & Technology Access report: http://www.ala.org/plinternetfunding

The full survey report, including state data, is available at http://plinternetsurvey.org/?q=node/13.  

Also available is a highly shareable executive summary: http://www.ala.org/ala/research/initiatives/plftas/2010_2011/plftas11-execsummary.pdf.  

Public Libraries Search and Compare Tool Updated

?

The Institute of Museum and Library Services just announced the Public Libraries Search and Compare tools have been updated with the national FY 2009 Public Library Survey unimputed suppressed data.

Search tool: http://harvester.census.gov/imls/search/index.asp

Compare tool:  http://harvester.census.gov/imls/compare/index.asp

Public Libraries and the Use of Web Technologies: What’s Happening in Colorado?

LRS’s newest Fast Facts, “Web 2.0 and Colorado Public Libraries: 2010 Update,” highlights the Colorado findings from our 2010 nationwide study of U.S. public libraries and their use of web technologies. Colorado’s results generally mirrored those of libraries nationwide, although it is ahead of its peers in areas such as web presence among libraries that serve less than 10,000 people, and the availability of chat reference service and RSS feeds. One in 3 (34%) Colorado public libraries has a Facebook account, about the same proportion as libraries nationwide. For more information, you can access the Fast Facts at: http://www.lrs.org/documents/fastfacts/296_WebTech2010.pdf. Or, to view the complete results of the study, as well as the first iteration of the study (from 2008), go to http://www.lrs.org/public/webtech/

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LRS is part of the Colorado State Library, a unit of the Colorado Department of Education. We design and conduct library research for library and education professionals, public officials, and the media to inform practices and assessment needs. We partner with the Library and Information Science program at University of Denver's Morgridge College of Education to provide research fellowships to current MLIS students.

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